Quantcast
Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Showcase


Channel Catalog



Channel Description:

Local News and Breaking News

older | 1 | .... | 767 | 768 | (Page 769) | 770 | 771 | .... | 2182 | newer

    0 0


    Some 500 students from the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, In. boarded buses Saturday night for the pilgrimage of a lifetime.

    About 7 a.m., the students, part of the university's campus ministry group, arrived in Philadelphia for Pope Francis' public Mass at 4 p.m.

    "This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity," said Nicole Steiner, 19, a sophomore originally from Massachusetts. "It's cool we're able to see him in our own country. He's an inspiring figure."

    The students will board buses back to Notre Dame Sunday night.

    Courtney Morin, 19, also a sophomore, said she's excited to be part of something so big.

    "He's such a huge figure in the world," Morin, who is from Indiana, said. "For me, it's being part of a moment when so many things can happen."

    The two young woman and several other students from Notre Dame stopped to pose for a photo at Philly's iconic LOVE sculpture before heading to the Parkway to find a spot to watch the Mass. They have tickets to get into the closer areas, they said.

    Students from Notre Dame have been following the Pope's movement throughout his historic visit to the United States.

    "We had Papal pancakes Thursday to watch his address to Congress," Morin said.



    Photo Credit: Morgan Zalot
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    Courtney Marin and Nicole Steiner are among 500 University of Notre Dame students who made a pilgrimage to Philadelphia for Sunday's Papal Mass.Courtney Marin and Nicole Steiner are among 500 University of Notre Dame students who made a pilgrimage to Philadelphia for Sunday's Papal Mass.

    0 0


    Hours ahead of mass on the Ben Franklin Parkway long lines are already formed at security checkpoints in Center City.

    0 0


    A classic case of being in the right place at the right time for a Delaware County family led to an once-in-a-lifetime encounter with Pope Francis.

    Nicole Campuzano, her husband, and their four children – including five-month-old Matthew – set up shop in front of a metal security gate at 5th and Market Streets about 11 a.m. Saturday.

    The Drexel Hill family had tickets to see Pope Francis at Independence Hall and they were hoping to possibly catch a glimpse of the Holy Father.

    However, when Pope Francis toured Old City in his “Popemobile,” something more magical and divine happened.

    Campuzano said her husband was holding Matthew when a Secret Service agent spotted him, took the child from his arms and walked Matthew over to Pope Francis in the Popemobile.

    Pope Francis then kissed young Matthew on his forehead and the Secret Service agent brought him back to his family.

    Nicole Campuzano told NBC10 prior to the Pope’s arrival, she had “feeling in her gut” that something would happen.

    “God paved the way” and it “worked out,” Campuzano said.

    Campuzano said Matthew was born with congenital hydrocephalus, a condition which requires brain surgery to place a shunt to relieve excess fluid in the brain. He had surgery at three days old. Campuzano said Matthew is doing well and has no issues.

    Campuzano, who is Roman Catholic, she has been “overwhelmed” by the positive response she has received since the divine encounter.



    Photo Credit: Nicole Campuzano

    Pope Francis kisses forehead of infant from Drexel Hill, Delaware County.Pope Francis kisses forehead of infant from Drexel Hill, Delaware County.

    0 0


    Pope Francis will be making an extra stop to meet with St. Joseph’s University students at the Philadelphia campus before his Parkway parade and Mass Sunday.

    The pontiff’s press office made the announcement of the extra stop on the pope’s itinerary for a statute blessing and visit to sick priests.

    The Pope was joined by Rabbi Abraham Skorka -- an old friend -- for a ceremony at Joshua Koffman's "Synagoga and Ecclesia in Our Time" -- a statue recently dedicated outside the university's chapel that commemorates the relationship between Catholics and Jewish people and 50th anniversary of Nostra Aetate decree.

    After the visit, excited students snapped photos as the papal motorcade left campus.

    "To have him actually set foot on our campus was unforgettable," said Saint Joseph’s president Dr. Mark C. Reed. "This is a truly historic day for Saint Joseph’s University, Jesuit education across the country and the importance of interfaith relations."

    The pontiff earlier visited sick Jesuits priests:

    St. Joe’s sits on City Avenue, a short distance from the pontiff’s temporary residence at St. Charles Borromeo Seminary in Wynnefield. The university is Jesuit and Catholic.

    Students at the university already got a huge thrill on Saturday when the pope’s motorcade was detoured through the college.



    Photo Credit: NBC10

    0 0


    Closed roads and barricades caused ire for plenty of Philadelphians during Pope Francis’ late September visit, but for some in the region, the quiet roads posed a unique opportunity.

    Runners took full advantage of closed bridges and even highways during the papal visit to get in a jog uninterrupted by cross traffic. Some runners were even spotted grabbing an unprecedented dash along the empty Schuylkill Expressway (Interstate 76) on Sunday.

     

    Running on 76 no cars

    A photo posted by @linda4725 on

    Not all runners were seeking a special thrill of running where it’s normally impossible. Instead, running groups organized unique Pope-themed runs including GoalsFit gym’s “Pope-Athon,” which went from the Manayunk gym to the Pope’ temporary residents in St. Charles Borromeo Seminary, popped up around the area this weekend.

    GoalsFit owner Kasey Manwaring had bigger plans for the papal Mass on Sunday afternoon, telling Runner’s World that she planned to run (or bike) to the Ben Franklin Parkway.

    If she runs, Manwaring should have plenty of open space on roads. And, that’s a welcome idea for some people who enjoyed roads like the Ben Franklin Bridge closing to traffic.



    Photo Credit: Bas Slabbers/NewsWorks

    Runners normally get a wide open Martin Luther King Drive on weekend in the summer but with the Pope in town, many more roads are open to pedestrian traffic.Runners normally get a wide open Martin Luther King Drive on weekend in the summer but with the Pope in town, many more roads are open to pedestrian traffic.

    Warnning: Do NOT Get Caught While Searching!!
    Your IP : - Country : - City:
    Your ISP TRACKS Your Online Activity! Hide your IP ADDRESS with a VPN!
    Before you searching always remember to change your IP adress to not be followed!
    PROTECT YOURSELF & SUPPORT US! Purchase a VPN Today!
    0 0


    The 14-year-old soprano singer credited by Mark Wahlberg as having "the voice of an angel" after nailing his performance at the Festival of Families with Pope Francis was given just a five-minute head's-up before he walked out on stage, according to his choir director.

    Bobby Hill, a soprano from Philadelphia, performed “Pie Jesu" by Andrew Lloyd Webber a cappella, which is unusual.

    The stirring work is usually accompanied on piano, according to Keystone State Boychoir director Steven M. Fisher.

    "It's a very difficult piece to sing," he said.

    The Keystone State Boychoir and Pennsylvania Girlchoir were booked for the festival Saturday to sing with Juanes for the final performance of the night on Benjamin Franklin Parkway.

    During rehearsals, the aspiring opera singer got a chance to sing "Pie Jesu" for famed Italian tenor Andrea Bocelli, another performer at the star-studded event.

    "He was in good form and feeling very confident," Fisher said of Hill.

    About a couple hours before the choir was set to go on, producers told Fisher they needed to fill a transition. Fisher waited to tell the young singer he'd tapped him for the unscheduled solo because he didn't want to make Hill nervous or get his hopes up if the opportunity fell through.

    But Hill didn't miss a beat when he found out about his responsibility.

    "I said to Bobby, 'we need you to go out and do this.' He said 'great,'" Fisher recalled.

    Hill's response to finding out he had to do the song a cappella: "Cool."

    "That's how kids are. They just don't panic," Fisher said.

    After the performance, Hill was seen on camera walking up to Pope Francis and giving him a present. That moment was also unscripted.

    Hill gave Francis a rock from Antartica, Fisher said. The Keystone State Boychoir in 2009 became the first choir to sing on the continent.

    Hill brought the rock on stage for good luck and had been told that if the pope approached him he could give it to him.

    "As kids often do, he walked right up to him," Fisher said.

    Still, Fisher found it significant that while the Festival of Families — part of the Vatican-sponsored World Meeting of Families gathering — featured people from six families representing the continents, the seventh continent hadn't been represented.

    "Our choir family was the seventh family," he said.

    Hill can be seen onstage again at the American premiere of "Aza'io" with the International Opera Theater in Philadelphia next month.

    [[329696541, C]]



    Photo Credit: NBC10
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    Actor Mark Wahlberg talks to Bobby Hill with Pope Francis in the background.Actor Mark Wahlberg talks to Bobby Hill with Pope Francis in the background.

    0 0


    Father Thien Nguyen talks about why he and a group of some 150 Vietnamese Catholic pilgrims traveled from New England and Canada for the Papal Mass in Philadelphia.

    0 0


    Chad Dion Lassiter says his moment with Pope Francis at Curran-Fromhold Correctional Facility was "awe inspiring."

    0 0


    Masses of Pilgrims making their way through the streets of Philadelphia on the way to the Papal Mass in Philadelphia Sunday broke out into song, played drums, and brought music to the march.

    Social media brought these moments to life as anticipation of the Pope's public Mass grew.

    [[329697341, C]]

    [[329697261, C]]

    [[329696911, C]]

    [[329696851, C]]

    [[329696751, C]]

    [[329696591, C]]



    Photo Credit: NBC10- Lauren Mayk
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    0 0


    Pope Francis made a surprise announcement on the last day of his U.S. visit, revealing that he'd met with people who have been sexually abused by clergymen. The move brought renewed focus on the issue, which has rocked the Roman Catholic church for more than a decade. 

    Francis isn't the first pope to apologize to victims of abuse, nor is he the first to meet with them – that would be Benedict XVI, seven years ago. 

    What makes Francis' remarks especially notable is where he made them – in Philadelphia, where the first U.S. clergyman was convicted for not acting to stop abuse in the city's archdiocese. Click through the timeline to see more events from the 30 year history of public abuse. 



    Photo Credit: Getty Images
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    Pope Francis speaks to international bishops at Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary, September 27, 2015 in Wynnewood, Pennsylvania.Pope Francis speaks to international bishops at Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary, September 27, 2015 in Wynnewood, Pennsylvania.

    Warnning: Do NOT Get Caught While Searching!!
    Your IP : - Country : - City:
    Your ISP TRACKS Your Online Activity! Hide your IP ADDRESS with a VPN!
    Before you searching always remember to change your IP adress to not be followed!
    PROTECT YOURSELF & SUPPORT US! Purchase a VPN Today!
    0 0


    Hundreds of thousands of pilgrims gathered in the heart of Philadelphia to watch as Pope Francis culminates his historic visit to the United States by celebrating Mass and talking once again about the importance of the family — the theme of the World Meeting of Families event that brought him to the country for the first time.

    Francis used the Mass on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway in downtown Philadelphia to stress tolerance, patience and the acceptance of others.

    "To raise doubts about the working of the Spirit, to give the impression that it cannot take place in those who are not 'part of our group,' who are not 'like us,' is a dangerous temptation," he said in a homily. "Not only does it block conversion to the faith; it is a perversion of faith."

    According to an "unofficial estimate" by people working the event, a crowd of 860,000 started making its way to security lines early in the day for a chance to get to see His Holiness up close. Even more watched on about 40 large TV screens that were set up in the city. Most of those screens were located about 25 blocks away from the Mass location.

    Francis told the pilgrims that "our common house can no longer tolerate sterile divisions."

    On family, he said love is shown by small daily signs which make people feel at home, and that faith grows when it is lived and shaped by love.

    "That is why our families, our homes, are true domestic churches," he said. "They are the right place for faith to become life, and life to become faith."

    He added: "Anyone who wants to bring into this world a family which teaches children to be excited by every gesture aimed at overcoming evil -- a family which shows that the Spirit is alive and at work -- will encounter our gratitude and our appreciation. Whatever the family, people, region, or religion to which they belong."

    Toward the end of his homily, he asked the audience a simple question.

    "In my own home, do we shout? Or do we speak to each other in love and tenderness? That is a good way of measuring our love."

    At the end of the Mass, Francis had one final message to those in attendance.

    "Thank you very much for your participation and your love for the family," he said in English. "And I ask you to pray for me. Don't forget."

    The Mass ends Francis' whirlwind six-day U.S. trip in which he has visited the White House, addressed a joint session of Congress, participated in a multi-religious service at Ground Zero, addressed world leaders at the United Nation's General Assembly and met privately with victims of clergy sex abuse at a seminary just outside of Philadelphia. The pontiff, who is known as the people's pope for his outward display of humility, also met with the homeless at a shelter and inmates at a jail.

    The City of Brotherly Love opened its doors this weekend not only for Francis (Archbishop Charles Chaput even joked about renaming the city "Francisville"), but to the thousands of people who arrived in the city to catch a glimpse of him at one of his many city-wide events.

    Among those in attendance at the final Mass was 61-year-old Junior Isaac, who arrived in Philadelphia without tickets.

    "I wanted to be part of history," said Isaac, who was wearing a U.S. Army hat. "I came all the way from Rhode Island without tickets. Within two hours I had four. I think God is a miracle and a feast.”

    Latonya Williams, a childcare provider from Philadelphia, attended the event with her three children.

    “I think he’s the best," Williams said of Francis. "I love his humble spirit. I wasn’t that interested in the other popes, and I’m not Catholic."

    A Grand Arrival

    The "Popemobile," a white Jeep Wrangler, began carrying Francis toward the alter at about 3:15 p.m. to the roars of scores of people lining the streets of Philly. His motorcade stopped briefly to view the "Knotted Grotto," a public art installation at the Cathedral Basilica of Sts. Peter and Paul.

    The Grotto is a place anyone can go, write their intentions down, and tie them onto one side of the courtyard fence to be "undone" by another person. People leaving intentions tie their own and then untie someone else's to move it to the other side in homage to Francis' favorite image of the Blessed Mother as Mary Undoer of Knots.

    Some 500 students from the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, Indiana, boarded buses Saturday night for their pilgrimage to the World Meeting of Families event.

    The students, part of the university's campus ministry group, arrived in Philadelphia around 7 a.m.

    "This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity," said Nicole Steiner, 19, a sophomore originally from Massachusetts. "It's cool we're able to see him in our own country. He's an inspiring figure."

    The students will board buses back to Notre Dame Sunday night.

    Courtney Morin, 19, also a sophomore, said she's excited to be part of something so big.

    "He's such a huge figure in the world," said Morin, who is from Indiana. "For me, it's being part of a moment when so many things can happen."

    The two young woman and several other students from Notre Dame stopped to pose for a photo at Philly's iconic LOVE sculpture before heading to the Parkway to find a spot to watch the Mass. They have tickets to get into the closer areas, they said.

    Students from Notre Dame have been following the pope's movement throughout his historic visit to the United States.

    "We had papal pancakes Thursday to watch his address to Congress," Morin said.

    A flock of Father Thien Nguyen's pilgrims donned bright yellow shirts and waited eagerly in front of a Jumbotron outside Philadelphia's City Hall on Sunday morning.

    Nguyen said the group of about 150 people from the Vietnamese Catholic community in Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Canada traveled to Philly for Francis' public Mass. Nguyen heard confession from a woman as many of his older pilgrims hunked down by the bigscreen to watch the Mass.

    "This group decided to stay here near the screen, food and bathrooms because they're older," Nguyen explained. "One group had tickets and went all the way up (the Parkway)."

    Nguyen said the Vietnamese faithful love the pope because of his care for the poor and the way he "represents Christ in the world."

    The group celebrated a Vietnamese Mass Sunday morning before the papal service later, he said.

    "We pray the pope will continue to be a great leader," Nguyen said. "We love the pope."

    Up Next

    After the Mass the Pope will travel back to Rome. His exit also means the World Meeting of Families ends. It was announced at the Mass that the next chapter in the religious event will take place in Dublin, Ireland, in 2018.



    Photo Credit: Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    Pope Francis (C) leads an open-air mass at the Benjamin Franklin Parkway in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on September 27, 2015.Pope Francis (C) leads an open-air mass at the Benjamin Franklin Parkway in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on September 27, 2015.

    0 0


    Before celebrating Mass with hundreds of thousands of pilgrims at the 2015 World Meeting of Families, Pope Francis visited prisoners at Curran-Fromhold Correctional Facility in Philadelphia.

    Francis sat down in a chair constructed by the prisoners, smiled, gave a thumbs up then shared a message of redemption with the inmates.

    "This time in your life can only have one purpose: to give you a hand in getting back on the right road, to give you a hand to help you rejoin society. All of us are part of that effort, all of us are invited to encourage, help and enable your rehabilitation," Francis said. 

    After he spoke, the pope blessed and embraced multiple prisoners. 

    "It almost brought me to tears. It was a once in a lifetime opportunity," said Chad Lassiter of Red Cross House who also serves on local prison boards. "You can tell he is a man of love, genuineness and kindness. We should display more of that behind the walls of prison. We should see more of this albeit they are incarcerated."

    After the pontiff's speech, Lassiter spoke to the pope who stopped right in front of him and touched his hand. With the help of an interpreter, Lassiter asked the pope to pray for the American Red Cross and the pope in turn asked Lassiter to pray for him.  

    Following the pope’s visit to Curran-Fromhold Correctional Facility, a network of community organizations called PICO National Network will begin a series of prayer vigils and meetings across the country over the next 40 days to draw attention to mass incarceration and the privatization of portions of the prison system. Among the cities where the events will be held: Los Angeles, San Francisco and Dallas.

    Members of the group traveled to Philadelphia for Francis’ visit, among them Tanti Martinez who hoped to reach the pope with the story of her son, Mario Martinez of Oakland, California.

    Mario Martinez died from an asthma attack in the Santa Rita Jail in northern California in July, while he was being held on an attempted murder charge.

    His mother blames inadequate health care provided at the prison by the same company that works in the Curran-Fromhold Correctional Facility, the privately held Corizon Health. Officials deny the prison care was substandard.

    Corizon Health Services, a for-profit company which has faced numerous lawsuits, will lose its contract at Rikers Island in New York City at the end of the year.



    Photo Credit: NBC10

    0 0


    Penn State students were involved in a crash on the Pennsylvania Turnpike that killed one person and injured six others, according to state police.

    The single-vehicle accident occurred shortly before 2 p.m. near milepost 319 in the westbound lanes of the Turnpike in Chester County Sunday. One person died in the crash while six other people were injured. Officials have not yet revealed the conditions of the survivors.

    The westbound lanes of the Turnpike were closed at the Valley Forge Interchange (326) for several hours. They were later reopened around 5:45 p.m.

    Pennsylvania State Police told NBC10 that the crash "involved Penn State students." They have not yet revealed however whether one of the students was the person killed in the crash.

    This story is developing. Check back for updates.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    0 0


    Miss your chance to see Pope Francis? Check out some of these pets dressed up in Papal garb!

    Photo Credit: Mary Cawley-Schmidt

    Miss your chance to see Pope Francis? Check out some of these adorable pets dressed up in Papal garb!Miss your chance to see Pope Francis? Check out some of these adorable pets dressed up in Papal garb!

    0 0


    WATCH NBC10's coverage of Pope Francis' visit to Philadelphia.



    Photo Credit: Jessica Glazer/NBC

    Pope Francis waves on the steps of Cathedral Basilica of Sts. Peter and Paul in Philadelphia, Sept. 25, 2015.Pope Francis waves on the steps of Cathedral Basilica of Sts. Peter and Paul in Philadelphia, Sept. 25, 2015.

    Warnning: Do NOT Get Caught While Searching!!
    Your IP : - Country : - City:
    Your ISP TRACKS Your Online Activity! Hide your IP ADDRESS with a VPN!
    Before you searching always remember to change your IP adress to not be followed!
    PROTECT YOURSELF & SUPPORT US! Purchase a VPN Today!
    0 0


    Hundreds of thousands of people descended on Benjamin Franklin Parkway for Pope Francis' public Mass. And not surprisingly, many of those people turned to social media to post photos and express their emotions. The above mosaic shows social posts from people on the parkway, overlaid on photos from the event. Are you at Benjamin Franklin Parkway? Use the 'Find Yourself' tool to find your post. 



    Photo Credit: NBC

    0 0
  • 09/27/15--13:47: Eagles Defeat Jets 24-17

  • The Eagles were winless, couldn't block or move the ball and had spent most of their first two games trying to find something remotely resembling a rhythm.

    The Jets were undefeated, playing well in all phases and coming off a dominant road performance against Andrew Luck and the Colts.

    And yet it was the Eagles who led the Jets during most of a 24-17 win, holding a double-digit advantage for the majority of the game.

    But all of those questions about the offense? They still remain.

    The Eagles won this one with defense (three second-half takeaways) and special teams (punt return TD).

    They had just 232 total yards of offense and only 53 in a scoreless second half.

    Key plays
    Rookie inside linebacker Jordan Hicks stood out in his first start, recovering a Brandon Marshall fumble and intercepting a Ryan Fitzpatrick pass in the fourth quarter when the Jets were gaining momentum.

    The key play early that gave the Eagles some separation was Darren Sproles' jaw-dropping, video game-like 89-yard punt return touchdown in the Eagles' 21-point second quarter. Sproles bounced off multiple Jets defenders and shimmied his way up and across the field to give them a two-score lead that didn't go back to single-digits until 2:32 remained. Most long returns involve numerous key blocks, but this one was mostly Sproles.

    The Eagles had been waiting for a special teams or defensive score to give the offense a much-needed boost. They scored 11 TDs on returns last season but had none in the first two weeks.

    QB report
    Sam Bradford did not have an impressive game, so if you're counting at home that's two decent quarters out of 12 this season.

    Bradford was a check-down machine again, barely looking deep and completing just two passes of 20-plus yards. This is a real issue. Bradford appears averse to contact and is throwing the ball in the flat almost instantly. Routes just are not developing deep down the field. You want a QB to take what's given to him, but if Bradford and Chip Kelly don't open this offense up, the three-and-outs and quick drives will continue to pile up.

    Bradford was 14 of 28 passing for 118 yards with a touchdown and no interceptions. He averaged 4.2 yards per attempt.

    His TD was a 23-yard wheel route to running back Ryan Mathews.

    Run game improves

    With DeMarco Murray sidelined by a hamstring injury, Mathews got the start and rushed 23 times for 106 yards. Mathews rumbled for 27 yards on one first-quarter run to equal the Eagles' season-long rush.

    Mathews' stone hands are becoming a problem, though. He dropped two more passes on the day to give him three on the season, and one of the drops against the Jets was a 10-yard route that Mathews could have possibly taken the distance because there was nobody in front of him.

    And Mathews had a bad fumble in the fourth quarter, having the ball punched out of his arms and up into the air, where a Jets defender caught it. The Jets started that drive in Eagles territory but it ended when Hicks came up with the timely pick.

    Sproles also received double-digit carries and scored a goal-line TD.

    Credit the offensive line for opening up many more holes than they did the first two weeks.

    Assessing the secondary
    In his first action of the season, rookie cornerback Eric Rowe had a breakup on Jets WR Devin Smith and later intercepted a ball intended for him in the end zone.

    Walter Thurmond made several nice plays down the field, and was impressively able to keep both feet in bounds on a fourth-quarter INT deep in Eagles territory. Thurmond possessed the ball, planted one foot and dragged the other.

    Malcolm Jenkins continues to make plays and sure tackles. He's had a strong season save for two dropped INTs.

    Byron Maxwell didn't have a true rebound game, but he wasn't victimized as badly as he had been in the first two weeks. Marshall had 10 catches and a TD, but most of his routes were underneath (110 receiving yards, 11 per catch).

    Injuries
    Murray missed the game, as did Kiko Alonso (knee), Mychal Kendricks (hamstring) and Taylor Hart (shoulder).

    Left tackle Jason Peters left the game in the fourth quarter and didn't return.

    Starting right guard Andrew Gardner left the game with a right foot injury and did not return. Matt Tobin took his place.

    Safety Chris Maragos also exited with a left knee contusion and did not return. That led to some playing time for Rowe and E.J. Biggers, who allowed an end-zone grab by Jeremy Kerley in the fourth quarter.

    What's next
    The 1-2 Eagles are back on the road for the third time in four weeks to face the Redskins next Sunday at 1 p.m.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    0 0


    The following is the official transcript of Pope Francis' prepared Holy Mass concluding the World Meeting of Families:

    Today the word of God surprises us with powerful and thought-provoking images. Images which challenge us, but also stir our enthusiasm.

    In the first reading, Joshua tells Moses that two members of the people are prophesying, speaking God’s word, without a mandate. In the Gospel, John tells Jesus that the disciples had stopped someone from casting out evil spirits in the name of Jesus. Here is the surprise: Moses and Jesus both rebuke those closest to them for being so narrow! Would that all could be prophets of God’s word! Would that everyone could work miracles in the Lord’s name!

    Jesus encountered hostility from people who did not accept what he said and did. For them, his openness to the honest and sincere faith of many men and women who were not part of God’s chosen people seemed intolerable. The disciples, for their part, acted in good faith. But the temptation to be scandalized by the freedom of God, who sends rain on the righteous and the unrighteous alike (Mt 5:45), bypassing bureaucracy, officialdom and inner circles, threatens the authenticity of faith. Hence it must be vigorously rejected.

    Once we realize this, we can understand why Jesus' words about causing "scandal" are so harsh. For Jesus, the truly "intolerable" scandal consists in everything that breaks down and destroys our trust in the working of the Spirit!

    Our Father will not be outdone in generosity and he continues to scatter seeds. He scatters the seeds of his presence in our world, for "love consists in this, not that we have loved God but that he loved us" first (1 Jn 4:10). That love gives us a profound certainty: we are sought by God; he waits for us. It is this confidence which makes disciples encourage, support and nurture the good things happening all around them. God wants all his children to take part in the feast of the Gospel. Jesus says, "Do not hold back anything that is good, instead help it to grow!" To raise doubts about the working of the Spirit, to give the impression that it cannot take place in those who are not "part of our group," who are not "like us," is a dangerous temptation. Not only does it block conversion to the faith; it is a perversion of faith!

    Faith opens a "window" to the presence and working of the Spirit. It shows us that, like happiness, holiness is always tied to little gestures. "Whoever gives you a cup of water in my name will not go unrewarded," says Jesus (cf. Mk 9:41). These little gestures are those we learn at home, in the family; they get lost amid all the other things we do, yet they do make each day different. They are the quiet things done by mothers and grandmothers, by fathers and grandfathers, by children. They are little signs of tenderness, affection and compassion. Like the warm supper we look forward to at night, the early lunch awaiting someone who gets up early to go to work. Homely gestures. Like a blessing before we go to bed, or a hug after we return from a hard day’s work. Love is shown by little things, by attention to small daily signs which make us feel at home. Faith grows when it is lived and shaped by love. That is why our families, our homes, are true domestic churches. They are the right place for faith to become life, and life to become faith.

    Jesus tells us not to hold back these little miracles. Instead, he wants us to encourage them, to spread them. He asks us to go through life, our everyday life, encouraging all these little signs of love as signs of his own living and active presence in our world.

    So we might ask ourselves: How are we trying to live this way in our homes, in our societies? What kind of world do we want to leave to our children (cf. Laudato Si', 160)? We cannot answer these questions alone, by ourselves. It is the Spirit who challenges us to respond as part of the great human family. Our common house can no longer tolerate sterile divisions. The urgent challenge of protecting our home includes the effort to bring the entire human family together in the pursuit of a sustainable and integral development, for we know that things can change (cf. ibid., 13). May our children find in us models and incentives to communion! May our children find in us men and women capable of joining others in bringing to full flower all the good seeds which the Father has sown!

    Pointedly, yet affectionately, Jesus tells us: "If you, who are evil, know how to give good gifts to your children, how much more will the heavenly Father give the Holy Spirit to those who ask him!" (Lk 11:13). How much wisdom there is in these few words! It is true that, as far as goodness and purity of heart are concerned, we human beings don’t have much to show! But Jesus knows that, where children are concerned, we are capable of boundless generosity. So he reassures us: if only we have faith, the Father will give us his Spirit.

    We Christians, the Lord’s disciples, ask the families of the world to help us! How many of us are here at this celebration! This is itself something prophetic, a kind of miracle in today’s world. Would that we could all be prophets! Would that all of us could be open to miracles of love for the sake of all the families of the world, and thus overcome the scandal of a narrow, petty love, closed in on itself, impatient of others!

    And how beautiful it would be if everywhere, even beyond our borders, we could appreciate and encourage this prophecy and this miracle! We renew our faith in the word of the Lord which invites faithful families to this openness. It invites all those who want to share the prophecy of the covenant of man and woman, which generates life and reveals God!

    Anyone who wants to bring into this world a family which teaches children to be excited by every gesture aimed at overcoming evil -- a family which shows that the Spirit is alive and at work -- will encounter our gratitude and our appreciation. Whatever the family, people, region, or religion to which they belong!

    May God grant to all of us, as the Lord’s disciples, the grace to be worthy of this purity of heart which is not scandalized by the Gospel!



    Photo Credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

    Pope Francis celebrates mass during the World Meeting of Families on September 27, 2015 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.Pope Francis celebrates mass during the World Meeting of Families on September 27, 2015 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

    0 0


    Maria and David Martinez know a thing or two about putting faith in God.

    So when they had the opportunity to travel from Toronto, where they live with their 10 children, to see Pope Francis celebrate Mass in Philadelphia, they took it. The Martinezes loaded five of their middle children -- ages 8 to 15 into a seven-passenger van and drove all the way to the city for the Pope's Sunday Mass.

    David, 54, is originally from El Salvador. He and Maria, 47, who is from Nicaragua, met in Toronto and married 25 years ago. When they wed, they had only each other -- no money or belongings, the couple said.

    "When we got married, we had nothing," David said.

    "I have seen God, a miracle in my life," Maria added as her children sat in a circle playing cards on a blanket the family set up near a jumbotron at 17th Street and Benjamin Franklin Parkway. "He provides."

    She said that beyond Pope Francis speaking their language, it means a lot to her and her family, who have struggled at times to make ends meet, that he comes from Argentina and has seen poverty in his own country.

    "He really saw the suffering," Maria said. "For us, a person who has really seen that means something."

    Maria said the couple is getting ready to buy their first home now, since rent in Toronto is becoming too much to afford. She said she knows they need to save money, but her faith wouldn't let her pass up the chance to take her family to see the Pope in person.

    "Being poor doesn't mean God is going to let you live in chaos," she said, smiling and motioning toward her kids. "They have what they need. They may not have all they want, but they have what they need."
     



    Photo Credit: Morgan Zalot
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    0 0


    He's their pope.

    The first priest from the Jesuit order to hold the Catholic Church's highest earthly role, Pope Francis has a special bond with the Jesuit-run St. Joseph's University.

    It was only fitting that the 78-year-old pontiff passed through the Philadelphia university’s campus several times as he headed back and forth from St. Charles Borromeo Seminary and Center City. Students lined up each time to catch a glimpse at the man they call Papa — cheering and waving as he rolled by in his iconic Fiat.

    But Sunday afternoon, Pope Francis made an unscheduled detour into the heart of the campus thrilling more than a thousand young Catholics who rushed to a campus quad after rumors spread that he might take a stroll through their school.

    “He’s transforming the church in such a positive way,” senior Kathy McGee said wiping away tears moments after the pope left. The Bucks County-native, who has such a strong connection with the Jesuit tradition she has a gesu tattoo on her ankle, cried as the pontiff shuffled by 10 feet from her.

    “He’s making such an incredible changes and centering the Catholic church around what it should be; about people and making the world a better place. Every transformation he’s making is only doing such incredible things for our church,” she said.

    Students began swarming a statue behind the university’s chapel around 11:30 a.m. The stone and bronze monument “Synagoga and Ecclesia in Our Time" was dedicated a week ago and honors the school’s Institute for Jewish-Catholic Relations. The institute is utilized as place to facilitate dialogue between the two regions, which are intertwined in their history.

    For three hours the crowd swelled, excitement built and the police presence grew in anticipation of the pope’s arrival. Shortly before his motorcade pulled up, the crowd hushed — anxious over what was to become a once-in-a-lifetime experience for many.

    When he stepped out of his car, countless smartphones went into the air with students jockeying to document the experience for their families and social followers.

    Pope Francis spent about seven minutes greeting guests, university staff and his longtime friend Rabbi Abraham Skorka of Buenos Aires as well as saying a prayer and blessing the statue with holy water.

    Moments after the pontiff pulled away to celebrate Mass on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, the students rushed the statue to touch it and wipe up the holy water.

    Michael Geraci, a senior from Newtown, Bucks County, dabbed the water on the silver cross hanging around his neck.

    “This was a huge surprise. A huge deal with the national security and he still came. On like the last minute they were like pushing us back and we still got through,” he said. “I feel extremely blessed right now to have such a great experience.”

    “He kind of does what he wants to do for everybody,” said Gina Pontarelli, a senior from Churchville, Bucks County, in an admiring tone. “I’m so happy he came.”

    Freshman Sara Rankin, from Springfield, Delaware County, was at a loss for words after the experience. “It was crazy. I don’t know! Like, the pope!” she exclaimed.

    “His presence was just a strong feeling for all of us,” said McGee who smiled wide as tears continued to flow. “It was one of the most incredible experiences in my life.”



    Photo Credit: NBC10
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    Pope Francis pauses for a prayer before blessing a statue commemorating St. Joesph's University's Institute for Jewish-Catholic Relations during an unscheduled visit to the school Sunday afternoon.Pope Francis pauses for a prayer before blessing a statue commemorating St. Joesph's University's Institute for Jewish-Catholic Relations during an unscheduled visit to the school Sunday afternoon.

    Warnning: Do NOT Get Caught While Searching!!
    Your IP : - Country : - City:
    Your ISP TRACKS Your Online Activity! Hide your IP ADDRESS with a VPN!
    Before you searching always remember to change your IP adress to not be followed!
    PROTECT YOURSELF & SUPPORT US! Purchase a VPN Today!

older | 1 | .... | 767 | 768 | (Page 769) | 770 | 771 | .... | 2182 | newer