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Introducing The Lineup, a New Newscast on Roku and Apple TV from NBC10

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We’re proud to introduce The Lineup, NBC10’s new newscast on Roku and Apple TV!

Hosted by NBC10’s Erin Coleman and Keith Jones, The Lineup is a quick way to catch up on the news you need – and the news you’ll be talking about – all day long.

New episodes of The Lineup will premiere on the NBC10 Roku or Apple TV app at 9 a.m. Monday through Friday, but you can watch any time that you need to get up to speed.

To watch The Lineup, search “NBC10” on in the app store on your Roku or Apple TV. Download our app, and you’ll see The Lineup.

man and woman in studio
Keith Jones and Erin Coleman

On The Lineup, Keith and Erin give you a quick summary of the most important local news and the national news that affects you. They get a chance to discuss and reflect. And you can join the conversation too, by following Keith and Erin on Facebook and Instagram.

And while you are in our Roku and Apple TV apps, make sure to check out the always-updated weather forecast and local news – plus NBC10’s special reports.


Find It on 10: Today's Links

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Looking for more information about a subject you saw featured on NBC10 News? Find it here!

TUESDAY, MARCH 30

The Monkey’s Uncle

FRIDAY, MARCH 26

CrossFit Main Line

Sign-a-Riffic

THURSDAY, MARCH 25

‘Big Time: Life in an Endangerous Age’ at the Philadelphia Zoo

Citizen’s Bank Park Career Fair

Lisa’s Army

Canceling NJ Vaccination Appointments

Virtua: Try to cancel via MyChart app; Visit https://www.virtua.org/cancel/ to request a cancellation; or call 888-VIRTUA-3

Camden County College: Cancel via the MyCooper platform or call 856-549-0530

Rowan Medicine Site: Cancel at this website: https://rowanmedicine.com/vaccine/cancel.html

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 24

Ready. Set. Philly.

Widener University’s High School Leadership Awards

TUESDAY, MARCH 23

Brandywine Valley SPCA

MONDAY, MARCH 22

Independence Seaport Museum

SUNDAY, MARCH 21

Black Diamond Queens: African American Women and Rock and Roll

SATURDAY, MARCH 20

Philadelphia zip codes where residents can get walk-up vaccinations

FRIDAY, MARCH 19

NBC10 Responds: Amazon Impersonators

Boxed Sourcing

THURSDAY, MARCH 18

Visit Philly Jobs

Chinese Immigrant Family Wellness Initiative

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 17

Brittingham’s Pub

TUESDAY, MARCH 16

Find a Blood Drive

St. Patrick’s Day ‘Stew Thru’

Philadelphia’s public meetings on water and sewer rates

MONDAY, MARCH 15

The list of 35 Philadelphia School District schools that will open March 22 is:

  • Bache-Martin School
  • Clara Barton School
  • James G. Blaine School
  • Bridesburg School
  • George W. Childs School
  • James Dobson School
  • Paul L. Dunbar School
  • Edwin Forrest School
  • Anne Frank Elementary School
  • Stephen Girard  School
  • Samuel Gompers School
  • Avery D. Harrington School
  • Jenks Academy for Arts and Sciences
  •  Francis S. Key School
  • Eliza B. Kirkbride School
  • Anna L. Lingelbach School
  • James R. Lowell School
  • James R. Ludlow  School
  • Alexander K. McClure School
  • William M. Meredith School
  • Robert Morris School
  • Motivation High School
  • George W. Nebinger School
  • Joseph Pennell  School
  • Richmond School
  • Roosevelt Elementary School
  • William Rowen School
  • Solomon Solis-Cohen School
  • South Philadelphia High School
  • Spring Garden School
  • James J. Sullivan  School
  • John H. Taggart  School
  • George Washington High School
  • S. Weir Mitchell Elementary School
  • William H. Ziegler School

Little Miss Moffitt Baker

FRIDAY, MARCH 12

AL DÍA Women of Merit

Pennsylvania COVID-19 Hospitality Industry Recovery Program (CHIRP)

THURSDAY, MARCH 11

Teach in Philly

The Trouble I’ve Seen: COVID-19 Portraits

NBC10 Responds — Here are some links for those who want to file an unemployment claim or speak with a claims specialist, by state:

Here are community legal aid programs:

Pennsylvania:

New Jersey:

Delaware:

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 10

Bridal Gown Giveaway

With Love Philly Notes

TUESDAY, MARCH 9

Mama’s Meatballs

MONDAY, MARCH 8

Poke Burri

FRIDAY, MARCH 5

Comcast RISE

THURSDAY, MARCH 4

Autsome Brushes

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 3

Providence Animal Center

TUESDAY, MARCH 2

Shipmate Fulfillment

MONDAY, MARCH 1

Gross McCleaf Gallery

Project Tamale

FRIDAY, FEB. 25

Tilton Park by Sug Daniels

Six Flags Great America Job Fair

THURSDAY, FEB. 25

Amalgam Comics & Coffeehouse

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 24

Lucky Dawg Animal Rescue

TUESDAY, FEB. 23

Her Daughters Cafe

MONDAY, FEB. 22

Makers Off Main

FRIDAY, FEB. 19

Black Doctors COVID-19 Consortium

Pennsylvania SPCA

ReAnimator Coffee Roasters’ Puppy Love Blend

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 17

Trunc

TUESDAY, FEB. 16

DIY Kit Creations

MONDAY, FEB. 15

National Constitution Center

FRIDAY, FEB. 12

Small Business Administration

New small business grants

Chef Big Rube’s Kitchen

THURSDAY, FEB. 11

Bucks County vaccine preregistration: 1-800-383-0371 or click here

Taqueria Amor

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 10

Neuchatel Swiss Chocolates

Vote for Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Nominees

TUESDAY, FEB. 9

Pennsylvania’s “Your Turn” website to check on vaccine eligibility

Marks Jewelers

MONDAY, FEB. 8

Farrell’s Florist

SUNDAY, FEB. 7

Academy of Notre Dame de Namur’s 48th Annual Virtual Fine Art Show & Sale

SATURDAY, FEB. 6

PlowPHL map, tracking Philly’s snow-plowing progress

FRIDAY, FEB. 5

Go Red for Women

THURSDAY, FEB. 4

Karma Cat and Zen Dog Rescue Society

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 3

Meatball U:

Sun Reys Beach Rentals

FRIDAY, JAN. 29

Earned Income Tax Credit

La Famigilia Restorante

Simeti’s Gymnastics Academy

THURSDAY, JAN. 28

More on Philly’s Restaurant and Gym Relief program

Marriott Courtyard Philadelphia South at The Navy Yard

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 27

The Philadelphia Citizen

TUESDAY, JAN. 26

The Wellness Collective

MONDAY, JAN. 25

Simpson House Tea Room

FRIDAY, JAN. 22

Buddha Babe Boutique

THURSDAY, JAN. 21

Sugartown Soaps

TUESDAY, JAN. 19

TerraVida Holistic Centers

MONDAY, JAN. 18

Forgotten Angels Equine Rescue

SATURDAY, JAN. 16

Bensalem Unity Week

The Giving Tree

FRIDAY, JAN. 15

Cornerstone Bed & Breakfast in Philadelphia

THURSDAY, JAN. 14

Hilton Garden Inn Camden Waterfront

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 13

Delaware County Citizens Corps

Chris’ Jazz Cafe

TUESDAY, JAN. 12

Black Doctors Consortium

Hawthornes

Pivot Coffee & Soupery

MONDAY, JAN. 11

Bungee Brand

SUNDAY, JAN. 10

Build your path to a new job with the Occupational Mobility Explorer

FRIDAY, JAN. 7

Bison Coffee Company

THURSDAY, JAN. 6

Shawnee Mountain Ski Area

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 6

Old City Canning Co.

TUESDAY, JAN. 5

Harth Builders

MONDAY, JAN. 4

KP Aesthetics

FRIDAY, JAN. 1

The Federal Stimulus Bill Explainer webinar from the Urban League of Philadelphia, U.S. Rep. Dwight Evans and Pa. Sen. Vincent Hughes
(Note: This link does not work well in Chrome; if it does not work for you, try another web browser.)

THURSDAY, DEC. 31

Bethesda Project

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 30

Animal Rescue League of Berks County

TUESDAY, DEC. 29

Bald Birds Brewing Co.

MONDAY, DEC. 28

Historic King George II Inn

THURSDAY, DEC. 24

Delaware Humane Association

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 23

Brandywine Valley SPCA

TUESDAY, DEC. 22

Providence Animal Center

Holiday Movie Night at Bar Lucca

MONDAY, DEC. 21

Itri Wood Fired

Mental Health Resources in Pennsylvania

FRIDAY, DEC. 18

Bristol Riverside Theatre

CHOP toy drive

THURSDAY, DEC. 17

B101 Christmas Choir Competition Voting

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 16

PA 511 for road conditions

Naked Brewing Company

TUESDAY, DEC. 15

MVP Recovery Now

MONDAY, DEC. 14

ACCT Philly

TODAY teams up with Feeding America

SUNDAY, DEC. 13

“Dolls for Daughters” toy drive

The “Illegal is the Project” documentary

FRIDAY, DEC. 11

The Joy of Giving

Moderna at Rittenhouse

U.S. Construction Inc.

THURSDAY, DEC. 10

Curiosity Doughnuts

Pennsylvania SPCA Animal Cruelty Line

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 9

Cunningham Piano Company

TUESDAY, DEC. 8

Salon Glam

MONDAY, DEC. 7

Noble Earth

The Wardrobe

SUNDAY, DEC. 6

Musicopia

FRIDAY, DEC. 4

COVID testing at PHL

And more COVID testing at PHL

American Red Cross Blood Drives

Burlington County Sheriff’s Department Toy Drive

This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

Mark Your Calendars: From Festivals to Sports to Music, Summer Fun Returns to Philly

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What to Know

  • Philadelphia is lifting its remaining COVID-19 restrictions on June 11, allowing for the return of popular events.
  • Many music, art and food festivals will return outdoors or in a hybrid format this summer.
  • Events will require varying degrees of COVID-19 safety protocols, such as wearing facial coverings and social distancing from others.

With Philadelphia set to lift remaining COVID-19 restrictions on June 11, many festivals, concerts and outdoor events will return to the Delaware Valley summer.

Visitors and locals can explore new exhibits at some of the city’s most popular museums (which returned to full capacity on May 21) and watch their favorite sports teams play live as stadiums return to full capacity. Many music, art and food festivals will return outdoors or in a hybrid format, including the first-ever outdoor edition of the Philadelphia Flower Show.

But keep in mind: Events will require varying degrees of COVID-19 safety protocols, such as wearing facial coverings and social distancing from others.

Here is a list of some happenings worth putting on your calendar.

Festivals and Special Events Return, Some Before Summer Officially Begins

The PHS Philadelphia Flower Show — The nation’s largest and oldest horticultural event will open outdoors for the first time in 192 years. The show will incorporate the landscapes of FDR Park in South Philadelphia, where it is scheduled to take place from June 5 to June 13.

Where: in FDR Park at Pattison Avenue and South Broad Street, Philadelphia

Hours: Saturday, June 5, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m., Sunday, June 6 – Sunday, June 13,  10 a.m. – 7 p.m.  

Hand to Hand Circus Festival — This two-week festival will feature contemporary circus acts such as acrobatics, juggling, clowning and aerials. The live performances will take place both indoors and outdoors in a socially distant manner from June 3 to June 13 by the Philadelphia Waterfront. 

Where: 140 N. Columbus Blvd. (at Race St.) Philadelphia

Hours: Check the website for details.

Philadelphia Juneteenth Parade & Festival — Juneteenth Philly will host a series of events including the Philadelphia Juneteenth Freedom Day Float House Competition and the Juneteenth Freedom Day March along 52nd Street, but the actual parade has been canceled due to COVID-19 restrictions.

Where: Philadelphia

Hours: June 19

Check the website for updated information.

Manayunk Arts Festival — The tri-state area’s largest outdoor, juried art festival will return to Manayunk on Saturday, June 26, and Sunday, June 27. The festival will feature ceramics, photography, jewelry and more from artists across the country. Festival-goers can also enjoy food and live music.

Where: Main Street, Philadelphia

Hours: Saturday, June 26, 11 a.m. – 7 p.m. and Sunday, June 27, 11 a.m – 6 p.m.

Wawa Welcome America — Philadelphians can celebrate the Fourth of July in America’s birthplace with a week of events, including a free concert. Previous headliners include Jennifer Hudson, Pitbull and Philadelphia’s own The Roots. Other activities have included hoagie-eating contests, block parties and movie screenings. The event culminates with a fireworks display over the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Last year, Wawa Welcome America included over 50 free online events and a live-streamed concert with performances by Broadway actress Cynthia Erivo, the Jazz Orchestra of Philadelphia and R&B singer Jason Derulo.

Check the website for updated information.

Blue Cross RiverRink Summerfest — Visitors can enjoy outdoor roller skating, boardwalk games, rides and mini-golf at the Philadelphia Waterfront all summer long. Outdoor concessionaires will be selling classic food items such as cheesesteaks, Crabfries, funnel cake and summer cocktails. Blue Cross RiverRink Summerfest is open seven days a week.

Where: 101 S Columbus Blvd., Philadelphia 

Hours: May 7- Sept. 26. Check the website for details.

Philadelphia Folk Festival — Established and upcoming musicians will perform at the 60th annual festival which will take place both virtually and in-person in Upper Salford Township, Pennsylvania. The festival will include music, workshops and activities, for all ages.

Where: 1323 Salford Station Rd., Neiffer

Hours: Aug. 19-22. Check the website for more details.

Grab a Drink and Food

Philly Beer Week — From June 4 to 13, Philly Beer Week will make its return after skipping last year due to COVID-19. The ten-day festival will feature events across the city including dinners, beer releases and educational opportunities. With the tagline “It’s Essential,” the festival hopes to stimulate the local economy and bring servers, bartenders and kitchen staff back to work. 

Where: Philadelphia

Hours: June 4 to 13. Check the website for details.

Parks on Tap This traveling beer garden will hold pop-ups in various parks throughout Philadelphia. Each park and location is selected by Philadelphia parks & Recreation and FCM Hospitality to highlight the offerings of city parks. Parks on Tap currently has two pop-up locations along the Schuylkill River.

Where: Water Works at 640 Waterworks Dr. and Trails End at Schuylkill River Trail via South St Ramp, South St & S 27th St.

Hours: Check the website for details.

Terrace on Tap — Another pop-up, Terrace on Tap offers local brews, specialty cocktails and small bites on the outdoor, second-floor of the Independence Visitor Center. The dining experience offers panoramic views of Independence Mall and will be open for reservations from late May to mid-June.

Where: 599 Market Street, Philadelphia

Hours: Check the website for details.

Museums Open to Full Capacity

Philadelphia Zoo — The Philadelphia Zoo in Fairmount Park is open daily with time reservations required for all visitors. This summer, the Zoo is hosting the exhibit BIG TIME: Life in an Endangerous Age, which features 24 life-size, animatronic creatures including the T-Rex and Woolly Mammoth. Visitors can also enjoy prehistoric-themed food at the new DINO-mite dining location.

Where: 3400 W Girard Ave., Philadelphia

Hours: Daily, 9:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Franklin Institute — The Science Museum in Center City is open from Wednesday to Sunday, with advanced ticket purchases highly recommended due to reduced capacity. A special display, “Crayola IDEAworks: The Creativity Exhibition” will be open until July 18. The exhibit features family-friendly games and problem-solving activities in collaboration with Crayola.

Where: 222 N 20th St., Philadelphia

Hours: Wednesday – Friday 10 a.m. – 5 p.m., Saturday and Sunday 10 a.m. – 6 p.m.

The Barnes Foundation — The Barnes is open from Friday to Monday in Center City, with a new exhibition focused on the affinities between the works of Chaïm Soutine and Willem de Kooning showing through Aug. 8. The exhibition, Soutine / de Kooning: Conversations in Paint, is in its world premiere and only showing in the United States.

Where: 2025 Benjamin Franklin Parkway, Philadelphia

Hours: Friday – Monday, 11 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Live Music Is Back

Ellen Reid SOUNDWALK — Fairmount Park is now home to a GPS-enabled piece of public art by Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Ellen Reid. The music is designed specifically for Fairmount Park to highlight the natural environment and encourage calm reflection. Visitors can experience SOUNDWALK through a free mobile app while following social distancing guidelines.

Where: 1 Boathouse Row, Philadelphia

Hours: Launches June 4

West Philly Porchfest — On June 5, West Philadelphia residents will host their annual “do-it-yourself musical festival” with musicians playing free shows on porches throughout the neighborhood. The festival aims to celebrate West Philadelphia’s musical and cultural diversity.

Where: West Philadelphia. Check the website for details.

Hours: June 5, 12 p.m. – 6 p.m.

The Mann Center — The Mann is hosting a number of bands and musicians in their outdoor music venue in Fairmount Park this summer. Brothers Osborne is coming on July 29, followed by the Goo Goo Dolls on Aug. 21 and Wilco and Sleater-Kinney on Aug. 22. HoagieNation 2021 on Aug. 7 will feature Daryl Hall and John Oates, as well as free hoagie tastings, food trucks, local craft beer and spirits.

Where: 5201 Parkside Ave., Fairmount Park, Philadelphia

Hours: Check the website for details.

BB&T Pavilion — Camden’s outdoor concert venue is hosting a number of notable musicians throughout the summer. Luke Bryan is performing on Aug. 8, followed by Jimmy Buffet on Aug. 8. Later in the month, James Taylor is performing on Aug. 25, with a concert by Alanis Morisette the following day.

Where: 1 Harbour Blvd., Camden, NJ

Hours: Check the website for details.

XPoNential Music Festival — WXPN’s annual music festival will feature Dawes, Los Lobos, The Record Company and Shovels and Rope. The festival will take place from Sept. 17 to Sept. 19 on the Camden Waterfront. 

Where: Wiggins Waterfront Park, 2 Riverside Dr., Camden, NJ

Hours: Sept. 17 to Sept. 19. Check the website for details.

Firefly — The annual music festival will feature headliner Billie Eilish, The Killers, Tame Impala and Lizzo. The lineup features more than 120 bands across seven stages. The festival is scheduled to take place in Dover, Delaware at the end of September. 

Where: 1131 N Dupont Hwy, Dover, DE 

Hours: Sept. 23 to Sept. 26. Set times will be released in the weeks leading up to the Festival.

Back to the Ballpark, Arena, Stadium

Philadelphia Phillies Home Games — The Phillies play at Citizens Bank Park through Oct. 3 (hopefully later with a playoff run). The park will return to full capacity in June but a small number of seating pods will be available for fans who prefer to remain socially distanced. Tailgating in the lots near the stadium will return on June 12.

Where: 1 Citizens Bank Way, Philadelphia

Hours: Check the website for details.

Philadelphia Union Home Games — Major League Soccer returned in early April and will continue through November with 34 regular season matches. Subaru Park, Philadelphia Union’s home stadium, will open at full capacity on June 23.

Where: 1 Stadium Dr, Chester

Hours: Check the website for details.

Philadelphia 76ers Home Games — The Sixers secured a spot in the NBA Playoffs and will play their first game on Sunday at home against the Washington Wizards. Home games will take place at the Wells Fargo Center and could continue through July (fingers crossed) depending on how deep of a playoff run the 76ers make. 

Where: 3601 S Broad St., Philadelphia

Hours: Check the website for more details.

Everything to Do at the Shore This Summer: From Music to Beer to Whales

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Who can forget this weekend, one year ago, down the shore? Beaches had restricted access. Fireworks were cancelled. Museums were closed.

Great news: It’s an entirely different shore for Summer 2021.

Today, the Jersey Shore is back and revved up to welcome visitors to all 51 beaches. Most attractions, museums and historic sites will be open, though with the ability to maintain social distancing.

And we’re here for all of it. Save and share this list — our look at some of the best events and fun happening at the shore all summer.


Summer-Long Concerts, Baseball and Cruises

Jersey Shore Blue Claws, Lakewood — Minor-league baseball is back at the Jersey Shore in Lakewood at FirstEnergy Park, the home of the Jersey Shore BlueClaws, a Class A affiliate of Major League Baseball’s Philadelphia Phillies. Through early September, you can see special visits by major league stars including Ryan Howard and Cole Hamels, who both spent time at this ballpark as they began their professional baseball careers. The modern stadium with more than 6,500 reserved seats features a mini-golf course, a game area, and new picnic areas for families. It also has plenty of space for social distancing. www.milb.com/jersey-shore

River Lady Cruises, Toms River — Returning to Toms River after not cruising last year is the River Lady, which takes its passengers on a 2.5 to 3-hour cruise aboard a reproduction of a Mississippi paddle wheel riverboat. Many historic towns, yacht clubs and boardwalks line the river as you cruise toward Barnegat Bay. Most people buy a ticket that includes a full lunch or dinner during the cruise, but sightseers can opt for a non-meal cruise on the top deck. Cruises will continue through early October. www.riverlady.com

Concerts on the Green, Suneagles Golf Club, Eatontown — Presented by Red Banks’ Count Basie Center for the Arts, Concerts on the Green is a socially-distanced pop-up venue that accommodates 500 people seated under a tent. Through the end of the summer, headliners include Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra Septet with Wynton Marsalis, Southside Johnny & The Asbury Jukes, Bruce Hornsby & The Noisemakers, Judy Collins, Indigo Girls and Dar Williams. Act quickly; many concerts are sold out. www.thebasie.org/venue/concerts-on-the-green

The PNC Bank Arts Center, Holmdel Park – Featuring nationally known recording stars and bands, this large outdoor venue off the Garden State Parkway opens with Steely Dan and Steve Winwood on Thursday, June 30. Other artists scheduled to follow are Chicago, The Black Crowes, Luke Bryan, Rod Stewart, Zac Brown Band, Jason Aldean and more. (Note: Because concerts have been cancelled and reschedule, read the website carefully.) www.banksartscentre.com

The Stone Pony Summer Stage, Asbury Park – Although the legendary Stone Pony has not announced any concerts indoors, the club’s terrific outdoor Summer Stage has concerts starting with the punk rock band Rise Against on Saturday, July 31. A full schedule of events follows including Southside Johnny & The Asbury Jukes, Sad Summer Festival and Shadow of the City: Bleachers & more. All events are general admission. (Note: Because concerts have been cancelled and reschedule, read the website carefully.) www.stoneponyonline.com/summer-stage

Whale Watching, Walking Tours, Attractions and Music

Whale Watching, Belmar, Highlands & NYC – For dozens of years, whale watching at the Jersey Shore was only available in Cape May. And you can still see them there. But now, on the northern part of the Jersey Shore, Jersey Shore Whale Watching in Belmar has expanded, offering daily trips starting in mid-June. After starting whale watching tours midway through the summer in 2020, Seastreak Ferry is offering three-time-a-week whale watching from its dock in Highlands. www.jerseyshorewhalewatchingtour.com and www.seastreak.com

“Thomas Eakins in New Jersey,” John F. Peto Studio Museum, Island Heights – For the first time, explore one of America’s painters and his pursuits in New Jersey at this special exhibition that started May 1. While mostly known as a Philadelphia painter, Thomas Eakins spent important time in New Jersey using his brush and camera to present activities he enjoyed in the marshlands, as well as the work of the shad fishermen in Gloucester County in southern New Jersey. www.petomuseum.org

Cape May Walking Tours, Cape May – Walking tours in Cape May made a big comeback last year because they are outdoors and people can easily social distance. Returning this summer is the Painted Ladies Porches & More Walking Tour. A new addition is Dr. Physick’s Neighborhood Walking Tour & Brunch.All tours are offered by Cape May MAC, which offers trolley tours throughout the year plus offerings tours of the Cape May Lighthouse and the World War II Lookout Tower which were closed for the part of the summer last year. www.capemaymac.org

The ShowPlace Performing Ice Cream Parlour, Beach Haven, Long Beach Island – The beloved singing “Waitri” will be opening the theatrically-based ice cream parlour with fun interactive service starting June 18. Reservations are available at Showplacereservations@gmail.com. Also, ShowPlace is offering the “Sing A Gram” — singing telegrams that can be booked with up to four singers to serenade at the recipient’s home, yard, porch, roof, pool or restaurant. www.surflight.org

Steel Pier, Atlantic City – The world-famous pier offers new music and food options aimed toward adult visitors. There’s Music Row Mondays, Live Music on Wednesdays and Island Time in North Beach AC on Thursdays. www.steelpier.com

Vintage Restaurant, Emlen Physick House, Cape May – After debuting mid-summer in 2020, Cape May’s newest outdoor restaurant has re-opened for the season serving brunch and dinner. With a diverse and eclectic menu and creative dishes from the KARA Restaurant Group, Vintage is one of Cape May’s best destination restaurants at one of its most historic sites. www.capemaymac.org/eatdrink/vintage

Asbury Ocean Club Hotel Opens — With amazing views of Asbury Park and the Asbury Park Boardwalk, this new luxury hotel opens with a rejuvenating spa and wellness services and high-end culinary experiences. It’s right across Ocean Avenue from the Boardwalk. www.hotel.asburyoceanclub.com

Congress Hall and Beach Plum Farm Activities, Cape May – Guest staying at historic Congress Hall or Beach Plum Farm have a host of tours throughout the week including birding, gardening, hikes, croquet and scavenger. Non-resort guests are welcome to sign up for archery and history tours through the hotel concierge. www.caperesorts.com/hotels

Festivals and Special Events

International Kite Festival, Wildwood, May 28-31 – Beginning with a 9 p.m. illuminated night kite fly on Friday, May 28, a “kite festival on steroids” will fly over Wildwood. Saturday and Sunday, large inflatable kites fly over the beach. Experienced and novice kite flyers perform single line, dual line and quad line aerial acrobatics on the Beach. www.skyfestivals.com 

The Atlantic City Beer & Music Festival, June 4-5 – On the former airport field not far from the beach, one of AC’s biggest event returns this year with 150 brewers, live music, food, plus the Hops Trot 5K on Saturday. www.acbeerfest.com

Independence Day Celebration, Historic Cold Springs Village, July 3-4 — Celebrate all things American with a variety of patriotic family activities, programs and music. The Village’s restored historic buildings will be open featuring demonstrations of Early American trades and crafts. www.hscv.org

Storybook Land, Classic Car Show, Egg Harbor Township, July 11 – ’50s classic car show with live music from Real Rock Drive band. www.storybookland.com

Barefoot Country Music Festival, Wildwood, August 20-22 – More than 30 of country music’s biggest stars are coming to Wildwood for a three-day event on multiple stages on 33 acres of the beaches of Wildwood. The current lineup for the fest includes Carrie Underwood, Zac Brown Band, Dan + Shay, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Lee Brice, Billy Currington, Jimmie Allen, Jon Pardi, Chris Lane, Lindsay Ell, Ingrid Andress and Carolyn Miller. www.barefootcountrymusicfest.com

Seafarers’ Weekend, Historic Cold Springs Village, August 28-29 — Pirates, music and family fun are on offer as the Village buildings feature historically clothed interpreters demonstrating the trades, crafts, and lifestyles of Early America. www.hscv.org

Sea.Hear.Now. Festival, Asbury Park, September 18-19 – Pearl Jam, The Smashing Pumpkins and The Avett Brothers headline this two-day surf, music and arts festival on the Asbury Park beach. www.seahearnowfestival.com

Horsepower by the Bay, Somers Point, October 16 – Street rods, antique cars, muscle cars, boats and military vehicles will be featured at this outdoor event. www.somerspointhistory.org

About the author: This spring and summer, Jersey Shore expert and author (“100 Things to Do at the Jersey Shore”) R.C. Staab is walking the entire 139 miles of the Jersey Shore from Sandy Hook to Cape May. Read his profiles of beaches and Shore towns as he walks along their beachfronts, boardwalks and promenades here.

FAQ: What to Know as Brood X Cicadas Emerge in 15 States and DC

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Hear that buzz? Billions of cicadas have crawled from underground in D.C., Maryland and Virginia to begin a weekslong period of cacophonous mating.

While some may be worried about creepy crawlies, University of Maryland entomologist Michael J. Raupp encouraged people to get excited about this exceptional event.

“This is a unique, natural phenomenon that happens nowhere else on earth besides the eastern half of the United States,” Raupp said.

These cicadas breed and grow in 17-year cycles, so they haven’t been visible in the D.C. area since 2004 — and a lot of people are wondering what to expect.

Here are answers to the most common Brood X cicada questions.

How long will the cicadas last in D.C., Maryland and Virginia?

The rest of June is looking buggy. By the Fourth of July, this rare event should be over.

One cicada’s above-ground life span lasts several weeks and Brood X may stick around for about five weeks after emerging. Once you start seeing cicadas, get ready to know your new neighbors well into June.

At first, you’ll see them emerge from the ground, then molt. After they mature into adults, the males begin making loud noises to attract mates.

How many Brood X cicadas are there?

Certainly billions, and likely trillions.

Do cicadas show up on weather radar?

All signs point to yes. Cicadas hitting their peak were likely the cause of a mass on the National Weather Service radar in early June.

How do you pronounce “Brood X”?

There are 15 broods of cicadas found in the United States. The cicadas emerging in 2021 are Brood X, sometimes called the Great Eastern Brood.

The “X” in Brood X is the Roman numeral for 10, so you’d say “Brood Ten,” not “Brood Ex.”

Where are the Brood X cicadas found?

Brood X covers the largest geographical area in the United States.

Brood X cicadas can be found in parts of Delaware, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, North Carolina, New Jersey, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia and D.C.

You’ll see the highest number of cicadas in parks, nature preserves and neighborhoods that underwent less construction and development in the past several decades.

Brood X cicada map:

Brood X cicadas are found in parts of 15 states. The USDA Forest Service’s map below shows Brood X territory shaded with yellow, or red with black stripes.

Brood x cicada map

Where won’t there be cicadas in D.C., Maryland and Virginia?

Cicadas aren’t going to take over all of the DMV. Here’s a map of where in the D.C. area you’ll find Brood X:

Map of areas in the DMV where cicadas are most likely.

Southern Maryland doesn’t get periodical cicadas, and Brood X isn’t typically found in central, southern or western parts of Virginia.

You’re also not likely to see them in recently built-up neighborhoods such as Navy Yard.

Are Brood X cicadas dangerous or harmful to people, dogs or cats?

No. Brood X cicadas don’t bite or sting and aren’t poisonous or venomous.

If dogs or cats eat a lot of cicadas, they may get some stomach discomfort due to the hard wings and shells.

Cicadas are not great fliers and sometimes land on humans. They have hard exoskeletons and suckers, though, and could poke your hand if you hold or squeeze one.

Are Brood X cicadas edible?

Yes, but be cautious if you have allergies — especially to shellfish.

The FDA says not to eat cicadas if you have a shellfish allergy.

If you do decide to chow down on a cicada, you may want to avoid the crunchy, hard shells and wings.

What are cicada recipes?

News4 partnered with a French chef to come up with gourmet cicada recipes.

You can try Caesar salad with crispy cicada croutons, cicada and beef chili dogs or cicada-rubbed grilled flank steak topped with crispy onions and cicadas.

Will Brood X cicadas eat or harm my garden or trees?

Most healthy trees will be able to withstand cicadas, Raupp says. Cicadas eat the sap from trees and lay their eggs on woody branches, especially of young trees.

You can use cicada netting to protect young or recently replanted trees.

If you’re considering transplanting any trees, it’s safest to put it off until the fall planting season.

Should I use pesticides on cicadas?

Raupp advised against using pesticides, since it’s harmful to the cicadas and may not be effective.

How can I have some fun with cicada season?

Play cicada bingo, download the Cicada Safari app to track what you see and tag @nbcwashington in your photos on Instagram, Twitter or Facebook.

How long do Brood X cicadas live?

Individual cicadas climb out of the ground, molt and then mature into adulthood over several days. Once adults, cicadas live three to four weeks.

The peak of cicadas singing, mating and laying eggs — and buzzing all around your neighborhood — typically happens within five weeks, according to Cicada Mania.

What do Brood X cicadas look like?

There are three species of Brood X cicadas. They all have six legs, red-orange wings and legs, and most have large, red eyes — except for a few rare instances of blue eyes.

Magicicada septendecim are usually the first to emerge and the largest. Their undersides are orange.

Magicicada cassini are typically smaller and emerge shortly after the septendecim species. They have black bellies.

Magicicada septendecula are also small. Their undersides are orange and black.

What do Brood X cicadas sound like?

Loud. The chorus of mating calls can reach 100 decibels — louder than a lawnmower.

They’re making a huge racket to find their mates, and different species have distinct mating calls.

M. septendecula make a ticking noise; M. septendecim make a “wee-oh” sound that’s been compared to a spaceship, and M. cassini sound like static.

When did the Brood X cicadas emerge in D.C., Maryland and Virginia?

Cicadas emerge when temperatures several inches underground reach about 64° in neighborhoods where they previously bred and lived underground for the past 17 years.

With temperatures warming in the D.C. area, crowds of insects have already emerged, climbing up trees and telephone poles to start singing a mating song.

The first signs of cicadas emerging appeared in late April in areas including College Park, Maryland, and upper Northwest D.C. More will come out in the coming weeks.

Cicada season reached full force at the end of May and beginning of June. Each area’s timeline could vary depending on the temperature and other factors in different areas, but once you start seeing cicadas in your area, their numbers could explode overnight.

By the end of June, the swarm should be over.

What are the signs of cicadas emerging?

There will be signs that cicada time has sprung — even before their legendarily loud mating songs begin.

The first indication that cicadas are emerging in your area would be dime-sized holes that go deep into the soil. Cicadas could stay in the holes for a while after digging them or climb up into trees.

After that, the signs will become harder to ignore. Expect to see a lot of empty, molted shells, even some that are left attached to vertical surfaces.

Then, you might need noise-canceling headphones to block out their songs.

Why do the Brood X cicadas come out every 17 years?

Cicadas emerge in massive numbers every 17 years to mate. That’s right: The loud chorus of buzzy screeches is a love song.

Their long lifecycles and massive numbers are likely both survival mechanisms for the species. Predators don’t rely on them for food, and their sheer numbers allow them to guarantee plenty of cicadas are born into the next generation — even if birds feast on many of the adults.

Temple University Names Jason Wingard President in Historic Appointment

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Temple University has appointed the school’s first Black president in its 137-year history.

Jason Wingard will begin his term on July 1, following the departure of Richard M. Englert, who has served as president since 2016. Wingard is a Philadelphia resident and West Chester native.

Temple’s Board of Trustees unanimously approved Wingard as the university’s 12th president in a meeting on Tuesday morning. Chairman Mitchell Morgan applauded Wingard as a strong leader who can guide Temple through the changing landscape of higher education.

Wingard knows Temple; he spent much of his childhood at the university meeting students, faculty and staff while his father attended graduate school there.

“I spent many, many nights, walking the street, playing ball with the neighborhood kids roaming the campus, meeting faculty, meeting students, talking with security guards,” Wingard said in a news conference Tuesday. “I had a long, long history with Temple.”

Wingard has spent the last 23 years living in Philadelphia, where he has raised his family, worked and attended school.

He said he was drawn to Temple because of the university’s level of excellence, its emphasis on equity and access and its role in forwarding innovation in learning.

Wingard said the three themes that will guide his presidency are amplifying and supporting Temple’s excellence, enhancing Temple’s value to prospective students and engaging with the Philadelphia community.

Wingard previously served as the dean of the Columbia University School of Professional Study and vice dean of the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. He stepped down as dean at Columbia last summer, but continued teaching there.

Wingard also founded The Education Board, Inc., a management consulting firm that focuses on executive coaching and corporate training. And he served as the managing director and chief learning officer at Goldman Sachs.

Wingard earned his bachelors degree in sociology at Stanford University, a masters in education from Emory University, a masters in technology in education from Harvard University and a doctorate in education, culture and society from the University of Pennsylvania.

Englert told the Board of Trustees he was ready to retire in July 2020 as he approached his 75th birthday. The university launched a nationwide search before landing on Wingard.

Englert will return to the position of chancellor — which he held from 2012 to 2016 — after retiring from the presidency.

Temple University’s Presidential Search Committee initially included 13 members of the Board of Trustees, two faculty members and the student body president. Following accusations that the search committee lacked diversity, it added Kimmika Williams-Witherspoon, the vice president of Temple’s Faculty Senate and Valerie Harrison, the senior advisor to the president for equity, diversity and inclusion.

The committee administered a survey and hosted several virtual town halls to receive feedback from students, faculty, staff, deans, alumni and community members throughout the search process.

Harrison told The Temple News the committee was searching for a candidate with a commitment to promoting diversity, equity and inclusion at Temple and in North Philadelphia, which they found in Wingard.

“It would be wonderful if the next president is an African-American woman, but there’s no litmus test,” Morgan told The Temple News in November. “We want to hire the best candidate.”

Wingard said that he recognizes the historic nature of his appointment and added that Morgan, the search committee and himself believe that he is the best candidate for the job.

“I am honored by the board’s selection and excited to lead one of the nation’s premier urban research universities,” Wingard said in a news release. “Temple will continue to provide its diverse and talented community of learners an unparalleled, accessible opportunity to leverage a best-in-class network of faculty and academic resources in support of dynamic and lifelong professional goals.

Jack Ciattarelli Wins GOP Primary, Beating Trump Boosters

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Jack Ciattarelli, the small business founder and former Assembly member, won New Jersey’s Republican primary for governor Tuesday, defeating rivals who claimed former President Donald Trump’s mantle.

Ciattarelli will go on to face Democratic incumbent Gov. Phil Murphy in November’s election. Murphy won an uncontested primary and warned Tuesday night that “truth” itself is on the ballot in the fall.

Ciattarelli defeated three challengers, two of whom promoted themselves as vocal Trump supporters. They were Hirsh Singh, an engineer from Atlantic County and Hudson County pastor and former real estate developer Phil Rizzo. Both men invoked the president as part of their efforts to win over the GOP vote in Democratic-leaning New Jersey.

But Ciattarelli won on the strength of his support among many in the party establishment, who delivered him coveted ballot position across the state. He’s also cultivated a following since four years ago when he lost the GOP nomination to then Lt. Gov. Kim Guadagno. Ciattarelli signaled his plans to take on Murphy early — almost as soon as Murphy took office in 2018.

Despite attacks from Rizzo and Singh, Ciattarelli refuted that he didn’t support Trump, even buying 3,000 Trump-Pence lawn signs.

Responding to critiques that he was a “never-Trumper,” Ciattarelli said he changed his mind since criticizing Trump early on.

“A whole lot of us said a whole lot of things,” he said during an interview with Harry Hurley on WPMG. “He earned my faith and confidence in the sense that his policies worked for the nation.”

Ciattarelli focused much of his primary race on attacking Murphy over his handling of the coronavirus outbreak and on bread-and-butter Republican issues like high property taxes. He also was the biggest GOP fundraiser, bringing in about $7 million and qualifying for public matching funds. Only Murphy raised more money than Ciattarelli.

Ciattarelli served in the Assembly, representing the 16th District, getting elected in 2011 and serving until 2018. He started a medical publishing company and is also trained as a certified public accountant.

Murphy, a former executive at Goldman Sachs and an ambassador to Germany in Barack Obama’s administration, won his first ever election in 2017 becoming New Jersey’s 56th governor.

“I think the contrast in this general election will be as stark as there has ever been,” Murphy said Tuesday night.

Murphy on Tuesday didn’t mention his predecessor, two-term Republican Chris Christie, but did cast the general election as a choice between Murphy’s policies, like phasing in a $15-an-hour minimum wage and raising taxes on millionaires, and Christie’s, who tightened the state budget, sought public pension reforms and opposed raising the minimum wage and higher taxes.

“We can either keep New Jersey moving forward or go backward. It’s a choice between standing for higher wages or going back to an economy that only worked for the wealthy and well-connected,” Murphy said in a statement.

No Shirt, Pants, or Undies: Just a Mask Required for Philly's Naked Bike Ride

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Philadelphia bike riders won’t need their shirts, pants, skirts or even underwear — just a mask.

Organizers of the annual Philly Naked Bike Ride say this year’s event will take place Aug. 28 and will require masks, based on the city’s earlier coronavirus restrictions.

The city lifted most of its COVID-19 rules this week, citing an increase in vaccinations and a decrease in cases. But ride organizers said they hadn’t had a chance to chat since the city’s guidelines changed so for the time being, they’re “going to stick with our initial mask guidance.” Lead organizer Wesley Noonan-Sessa said they’ll keep an eye on what the city says in the next month or so.

Ride participants, sometimes in the thousands, usually gather in a park to strip off their clothes and paint each other’s bodies before carefully hopping on their bikes. The naked ride is to promote positive body image, advocate for the safety of cyclists and protest dependence on fossil fuels.

Riders pedal a 10-mile (16-kilometer) course while taking in sights including Independence Hall, the Liberty Bell and the Philadelphia Museum of Art’s steps, featured in the “Rocky” movies.

The coronavirus pandemic slammed the brakes on the ride that had been planned for last year. Organizers said then that canceling the 2020 event was “the most responsible thing to do.”

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Man Arrested After Attack Being Investigated for Possible Connection to 3 Murders

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A man who has been charged with a violent attack in a Delaware store is now being investigated for a possible connection to three murders, including that of a North Philadelphia Dunkin’ store manager and a Delaware Metro by T-Mobile store employee, law enforcement sources said.

Keith Gibson was arrested in Wilmington Tuesday morning after he allegedly pistol-whipped a clerk at a Delaware Rite Aid.

Multiple law enforcement sources told NBC10 Gibson is also being investigated for a possible connection to three murders, including that of his own mother.

He has not been charged with murder.

The most recent murder being investigated occurred over the weekend. Early Saturday morning, Christine Lugo, 40, was shot and killed by an armed robber as she was opening the Dunkin’ store on the 500 block of W. Lehigh Avenue in Philadelphia’s Fairhill neighborhood.

Christine Lugo

Surveillance video shows a man standing outside near the door before forcibly grabbing Lugo and pushing her inside the store as he brandished a handgun. The video further shows him forcing her into the kitchen, then a storage room, where he makes her give him cash.

Police said that after Lugo gave him the money, the man shot her once in the head and fled. Lugo was declared dead at the scene.

Surveillance photo of the suspect.

Police released surveillance photos of the suspect. Law enforcement sources told NBC10 the man’s description matched a suspect in a similar crime in May in which a woman working at a Metro by T-Mobile store in Elsmere, New Castle County, Delaware, was killed by an armed robber who also stole her car. 

The victim in the Delaware shooting was identified as Leslie Ruiz Basilio. Basilio’s mother, Celia Basilio, told Telemundo 62 that if the man in custody was the person who killed her daughter, she’s happy he can’t hurt anyone anymore.

“He doesn’t deserve to be a free man,” she said.

Leslie Ruiz-Basilio

Law enforcement sources told NBC10 Gibson is also being investigated for a possible connection to the murder of his mother in February.

Gibson has a decade-long criminal history in Delaware, according to the state’s Attorney General’s Office. He was sentenced to 15 years in prison in 2010 for manslaughter, with his sentence suspended to eight years. Dating back to 2000, he was also convicted of a weapon charge, forgery, assault and multiple drug dealing counts.

When Gibson was arrested Tuesday morning following the attack at Rite Aid, he was wearing a bullet proof vest and in possession of a gun, ammunition, a knife and drugs, police said.

Gibson was held on more than $300,000 bail. Federal agents, Wilmington police and Philadelphia police continue to investigate.

Did You Feel It? Small Morning Earthquake Rumbles New Jersey

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You may not have noticed it, but there was an actual earthquake in New Jersey on Wednesday morning,

A magnitude 2.4 quake struck just south of Tuckerton at 7:52 a.m., the U.S. Geological Survey said.

The quake was relatively shallow, at a depth of just over 3 miles, and nearly two dozen people noted feeling it in the USGS’s reporting system. The shaking was categorized as “moderate,” with the expectation of only very light damage.

Earthquakes are not necessarily unusual in the state; Wednesday's temblor was the fourth in the last 12 months, per government data.

According to the state's Department of Environmental Protection, New Jersey is actually considered overdue for a moderate earthquake, much like the magnitude 5.5 quake that hit in 1884.

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First Alert: Steamy Storms to Bring Another Flooding Threat

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What to Know

  • Expect more hot and humid conditions Wednesday ahead of more storms that bring a flooding threat to parts of the Philadelphia region.
  • A First Alert will be in effect from 2 p.m. to 10 p.m. Wednesday.
  • How quickly the storms move through depends on how bad the flooding will be.

Strong storms slammed parts of the region on Tuesday, causing flash flooding, damage and water rescues in Chester County, Pennsylvania. And, more storms are expected on a hot and humid Wednesday.

A First Alert for the threat of flooding is in effect for most of the Philadelphia region from 2 p.m. to 10 p.m. Wednesday. Pennsylvania neighbors are most vulnerable to the flooding threat caused by downpours.

The pattern on Wednesday is almost exactly the same as what we saw Tuesday when around 7 inches of rain fell in parts of Chester County as storms brought heavy periods of rain, lightning and gusty winds Tuesday afternoon. Several water rescues were reported in Thorndale, Coatesville, West Caln Township and Sadsburyville.

Residents were being warned to stay off roads when possible and not drive through water covering roadways. The mantra is “turn around, don’t drown” if you see a flooded road.

Not all drivers took that advice near Route 1 and Creek Road Wednesday morning as residual flooding continued into the morning rush. There is a flood warning for Brandywine Creek in near Chadds Ford in Delaware and Chester counties.

The heat is also expected to be uncomfortable Wednesday ahead of the storms. A heat advisory is in effect for Philadelphia and the surrounding urban corridor until 8 p.m. It will feel like the 90s, again.

The heat breaks heading into the weekend. Expect cooler temps on the way with highs in the 80s Thursday and only upper 60s on Friday. There is a chance for showers, however, on each day with spot storms Thursday and showers or just a sprinkle on Friday.

Download the NBC10 app and tune into the First Alert Weather Team on air to get the latest on the storms and flooding threat.

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Marine Recruit From NJ Dies in Final Test of Parris Island Training

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What to Know

  • Authorities are investigating the death of a 19-year-old Marine Corps recruit during a strenuous exercise that caps a 13-week training course at South Carolina’s Parris Island.
  • Installation officials say Pfc. Dalton Beals died Friday during an exercise known as “The Crucible,” the final test of recruit training.
  • Beals graduated in 2020 from Pennsville Memorial High School in Pennsville, New Jersey.

Authorities are investigating the death of a 19-year-old Marine Corps recruit during a strenuous exercise that caps a 13-week training course at South Carolina’s Parris Island.

According to a Facebook post from officials with the installation — one of two Marine training depots in the country — Pfc. Dalton Beals died Friday during an exercise known as “The Crucible,” the final test of recruit training.

Further details about Beals’ death, which remains under investigation, have not been released.

Beals graduated in 2020 from Pennsville Memorial High School in Pennsville, New Jersey, the school noted in a Facebook post.

Several days before Beals began The Crucible, his mother posted on Facebook about the details of the grueling exercise, which she called “the final leg of my baby’s journey to becoming a Marine!” The 54-hour effort, during which recruits are allowed limited food and sleep, includes 48 miles of hiking, loaded with heavy gear.

A GoFundMe set up to help Beals’ family with funeral expenses noted that he had been set to graduate from training on June 18.

Flags in New Jersey were lowered to half-staff at all state buildings and facilities on Wednesday in Beals’ memory.

“His recent passing is a tragic loss for New Jersey and for our country,” Gov. Phil Murphy said.

There have been a number of recruit deaths through the years at Parris Island, which has been training Marines since 1915 on the island off South Carolina’s coast.

In 2018, a judge dismissed a lawsuit from the family of Raheel Siddiqui, a 20-year-old recruit from Michigan who killed himself in 2016 after a confrontation with a Parris Island drill instructor.

Siddiqui’s family disputed his suicide, saying he was targeted because of his Islamic faith. Several Marines were ultimately convicted for abuse, following evidence that drill instructors beat, choked and kicked recruits.

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Pa. House Votes to End Gov. Tom Wolf's Pandemic Disaster Declaration

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What to Know

  • A vote by the Pennsylvania House of Representatives makes the governor’s pandemic disaster emergency closer to ending.
  • The Republican-controlled House voted on party lines Tuesday to put a halt to the disaster declaration. It goes to the Senate, where passage would be the last word.
  • State regulations that have been suspended or waived will be put back into effect, although that process in some cases may take months. The resolution may affect Pennsylvanians’ ability to get additional food subsidies.

Pennsylvania’s House of Representatives voted on party lines Tuesday to put an end to the governor’s pandemic disaster emergency declaration, less than a month after voters dramatically expanded lawmakers’ powers to control such declarations.

The 113-90 vote sent the Republican-penned measure over to the Senate, where the GOP also holds a substantial majority. If it passes the Senate, Gov. Tom Wolf’s emergency declaration, extended since March 2020, would expire as soon as the state’s May 18 primary election results are fully certified.

“The people have spoken,” House Majority Leader Kerry Benninghoff, R-Centre, said after the vote. “That’s why it went to referendum.”

House Democrats said the majority Republicans were playing games with people’s health and well-being, saying the end of the declaration would leave people homeless, children with less food and utilities cut off, among other consequences.

Wolf, a Democrat, has no role in signing or vetoing the resolution.

Hours before the House Republicans unveiled and pushed through an amendment to end the declaration almost immediately, Wolf said he was in favor of a proposal to extend his disaster declaration. He said policymakers needed to address the passage of the constitutional amendment.

“I support what they’re doing. We’re all trying to make this work out,” he said. “And I have some maybe constitutional concerns at the margins but I think you know we’re all trying to make sure this works, this is the change that the people of Pennsylvania wanted, so it’s on us to make it work.”

After an unrelated news conference outside the state Capitol, Wolf said “there are some things that are moot now that maybe weren’t two weeks ago now the things, mitigation’s been lifted. So there’s some things like that. But we’re all trying to figure out how to make it work.”

State regulations that have been suspended or waived under the disaster declaration will go back into effect, although that process in some cases may take months. The resolution may also affect Pennsylvanians’ ability to get additional food subsidies.

It ends Wolf’s waiver of a work-search requirement for hundreds of thousands of people who collect unemployment benefits and stops the administration’s use of emergency procurement procedures.

Other than a masking order, all mitigation orders have already been phased out, and Wolf’s administration had outlined a schedule for resumption of job search requirements.

House Republicans said that if the Senate also passes the resolution, Wolf will be prevented from issuing any new disaster declaration related to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Wolf’s office has said repeatedly that measures designed to limit the spread of the virus are unaffected by the constitutional amendments because they are authorized under powers given to the health secretary.

In the state Senate, a vote was possible as early as Wednesday on a bill that would repeal the state secretary of health’s powers to order people who haven’t tested positive for a disease to obey travel restrictions, wear masks, undertake a specific hygienic practice or isolate at home.

It also would prohibit so-called “vaccine passports” by local governments, state agencies or colleges and universities.

Voters on May 18 put a 21-day limit on future disaster emergency declarations and gave lawmakers authority to extend them if both the House and Senate agree. The pair of constitutional amendments was put on the ballot by Republican majorities in the Legislature.

Live in Delaware? Vaccinated? You Could Win $302,000!

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If you live in Delaware, you could be eligible to win $302,000 in cash just for receiving your COVID-19 vaccine.

Or you might win $5,000 in cash in twice-weekly drawings — or other prizes.

The prizes are part of a new initiative, called “DE Wins!,” which the state launched on May 25 to provide public education and incentives for vaccination. Small businesses will also offer incentives to Delawareans who get their shots, according to a state news release.

“The simple message here is that Delaware wins when everybody gets vaccinated,” Gov. John Carney said at a COVID news briefing.

One group of prizes targets Delawareans 18 and older who get vaccinated between May 25 and June 29. Those people will be entered for a chance to win one of two $5,000 cash prizes each week. Or, they could win a four-day vacation, Firefly Music Festival tickets or free tolls in the state of Delaware.

Another group of prizes targets young people aged 12 to 17 vaccinated at any time. They could win a full scholarship to a public Delaware university. Or they could win prizes that include packages from Funland in Rehoboth, the Wilmington Blue Rocks and the Delmarva Shorebirds.

Carney announced three new prizes for the DE Wins! Raffle on June 10, as the First State approaches its goal of 70% of adults receiving at least one dose by July 4. 

Wilmington University will award a full undergraduate and graduate scholarship, including tuition and fees. Two free tickets to every show at The Grand during the 2021-2022 season are also up for grabs.

“We are getting closer to our goal of having 70 percent of Delaware adults vaccinated with at least one dose by July 4,” Carney said in a news release. “To make that final push, we are adding new prizes to the DE Wins raffle. All of these prizes celebrate places that people love in our state, and experiences you can get back to safely once you’re vaccinated.”

As of June 9, 67.6% of Delaware adults have received at least one dose of the vaccine, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The Delaware Lottery will conduct the drawings on Mondays and Fridays from May 31 to June 30, according to the release.

On June 30, to wrap up the campaign, the state will enter every vaccinated Delaware resident into a drawing for a $302,000 cash prize and two low-number Delaware license plates. The drawing will be conducted by the Delaware Lottery.

The Delaware Division of Small Businesses also launched the Small Business Incentive Fund to reimburse qualifying businesses, such as restaurants, bars, breweries and gyms, for incentives they give to vaccinated people.

Delawareans who receive the vaccine at locations managed by the Delaware Division of Public Health and the Delaware Emergency Management Agency between May 25 and June 29 will also receive a $10 gift card.

Man With Decadeslong Criminal History Eyed in 5 Murders Including Dunkin' Worker and His Mother

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What to Know

  • Keith Gibson, 39, is under arrest in Delaware for allegedly pistol-whipping a Rite Aid worker during a robbery.
  • Gibson is implicated in the shooting death of Christine Lugo during a robbery at a North Philadelphia Dunkin’ store.
  • Police are also investigating whether Gibson, who was on probation in Delaware, killed a cell phone store clerk, his mother, and two other men in Philadelphia.

Police believe the man who killed a North Philadelphia Dunkin’ store manager is the same man arrested for attacking a Rite Aid worker in Delaware, and they’re looking into whether he may have also been involved in at least four other killings, including that of his mother.

Keith Gibson, 39, was arrested in Wilmington Tuesday morning after he allegedly pistol-whipped a clerk at a Delaware Rite Aid. Philadelphia Police Chief Inspector Frank Vanore said Philadelphia officials plan to ask for his extradition in connection to the slaying of 40-year-old Christine Lugo in the city’s Fairhill section this weekend. They also think he may be responsible for three other Philadelphia deaths: that of his mother and that of two men at a store.

Christine Lugo

Vanore said Gibson’s mother was found shot to death in February of this year in Philadelphia at her place of work. Investigators did not find any spent shell casings or gun, nor was there video of a suspect, the chief inspector said.

Similarly, two men were shot dead in a store in the city’s Germantown neighborhood in January, but police did not recover a gun. Vanore said there still remain questions to be answered in the slayings, but it’s “certainly on our list of cases that we’re looking at” with regard to Gibson’s possible involvement.

Philadelphia police had detained Gibson around the time of his mother’s death in February, but it was because he was in the city in violation of parole in a case stemming from Delaware, Vanore said.

The parole violation was in relation to his 2010 conviction of manslaughter and possession of a firearm during the commission of a felony, Delaware Department of Corrections spokesman Jason Miller said. Gibson was released from prison in June 2020, after which he had to serve six months at a Level IV Community Corrections Center. During his time at the corrections center, he violated probation by fighting with other offenders and was sentenced to six additional months, as well as 18 months of probation upon his release, Miller said.

Gibson began his probation term in December of last year but violated it by leaving Delaware in February of this year, Miller said. This coincides with when Philadelphia police detained him for violating his probation.

He was returned to Delaware in late March and sentenced to 31 days, time served, in late April, as well as 18 months of probation, Miller said.

Gibson has a decadeslong criminal history in Delaware besides the manslaughter conviction, according to the state’s Attorney General’s Office. Dating back to 2000, he was also convicted of a weapon charge, forgery, assault and multiple drug dealing counts.

Police think Gibson, during his time out of prison for the latest probation violation, may have also been involved in the murder of a Metro by T-Mobile employee in Elsmere, Delaware, that happened in May.

Vanore, the Philadelphia police chief inspector, said that shortly after this month’s murder at the North Philadelphia Dunkin’ store, Elsmere police contacted the Philadelphia Police Department to alert them that they believed the man shown on surveillance video in that killing matched the description of a suspect in the Metro by T-Mobile store slaying of 28-year-old Leslie Ruiz-Basilio.

The morning after the Dunkin’ killing, in which around $300 were stolen and which claimed the life of 40-year-old Christine Lugo, there were two robberies in Delaware, Vanore said.

The first was at a convenience store and left one man wounded, Vanore said. The next was a street robbery that left a man dead hours later, he said.

Gibson was finally arrested Tuesday of this week after allegedly pistol-whipping a clerk at a Delaware Rite Aid during a robbery. He was found in possession of a revolver, Vanore said, adding that Lugo was also killed using a revolver.

Police found Gibson by using a GPS tracker that was in some of the money handed over to him during the Rite Aid robbery, according to an affidavit of probable cause.

At the time of his arrest, he was wearing a bulletproof vest, according to the court document.

The Philadelphia District Attorney’s Office on Wednesday approved murder charges for Gibson in Lugo’s murder. A spokesperson for the prosecutor’s office said it will be some time before the extradition is approved by Delaware.


Camden Interim Mayor Wins Big in Democratic Primary Election

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Vic Carstarphen, a former Camden High School star basketball player and councilman in the small South Jersey city who has been serving as interim mayor since March, won the Democratic primary for mayor on Tuesday.

Carstarphen’s landslide victory assures he will win a four-year term as mayor, starting next January, barring a write-in campaign in the November general election. No Republicans ran in the primary seeking their party’s nomination for mayor.

The former councilman was handpicked by Camden County political bosses to replace former Mayor Frank Moran following Moran’s resignation in March.

Carstarphen received nearly 64% of 3,900 votes case in the June 8 primary, according to results posted on the county website, beating out three other candidates.

  • Victor Carstarphen: 2,495 (63.97%)
  • Elton Custis: 878 (22.51%)
  • Luis Quinones: 324 (8.31%)
  • Felisha Reyes-Morton 200 (5.13%)

Moran, 52, was elected mayor in 2017 and is leaving office with about 10 months to go in his first term. He has not yet given a specific date for his departure, but it is imminent, a source close to Moran said.

Carstarphen led Camden High to multiple state sectional championship finals and went on to play for some of Temple University’s best men’s basketball teams during former coach John Chaney’s long tenure.

94-Year-Old Man Will Finally Walk at Graduation After Missing His Own Due to WWII

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In 1945, World War II Veteran Ed Kinslow missed his high school graduation because he was busy flying for the Air Force. At age 94, he is finally getting the chance to walk across the stage on graduation day.

Kinslow said many of his classmates at the all-boys Roman Catholic High School in Philadelphia also missed the graduation ceremony because they were serving in World War II. When he walks across the stage on Friday, Kinslow will represent his peers who did not return from fighting overseas.

“I was only one of thousands of men, served in the service and action and everything during the war,” Kinslow said. “Thousands and thousands were killed, never came back. A lot of my friends never came back.”

Despite missing the ceremony, Kinslow still received his diploma and class ring, which he wears every day. For years, he’s talked about how much he regretted missing the opportunity to walk at graduation and celebrate the important rite of passage.

“He cherished those days at Roman and for him not to be at his graduation was sort of like a missed part of his life,” Dennis Kinslow, Ed Kinslow’s son, said. 

Ed Kinslow will symbolically walk across the stage at the graduation ceremony for the Roman Catholic High School Class of 2021.

“I hope they realize that that is such a privilege and an honor — and you just can’t take that for granted,” Lorraine Kinslow, Ed Winslow’s daughter-in-law, said.

“And to wait all these years later and have it happen, I just hope those students feel the impact of the service that these men of that generation gave so that we can graduate and be free.” 

Good Samaritan Saves Woman Trapped in Sinking Sand at Jersey Shore Beach

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What to Know

  • A woman was walking on a beach in Ventnor, New Jersey, around 4 p.m. Tuesday when she suddenly sank in watery sand up to her waist.
  • A man nearby spotted her and waded through numerous sinkholes to pull her to safety.
  • The incident occurred at a construction site after workers had left for the day. However, no warning signs were posted at the time.

A Good Samaritan jumped into action after a woman began to sink in soft sand at a Jersey Shore beach construction site that didn’t have any warning signs posted. 

The woman was walking on a beach in Ventnor, New Jersey, around 4 p.m. Tuesday when she suddenly sank in watery sand up to her waist. Fortunately for her, a man nearby spotted her and waded through numerous sinkholes to pull her to safety. 

“Thank God that a Good Samaritan there was a man walking by that helped her,” Helene Cohen of Margate, New Jersey, told NBC10. “It’s a dangerous situation. If nobody was there, who knows what would have been.” 

A witness said the woman was shaken but did not appear to be injured. The sand was apparently loosened by construction to extend a storm water drainage pipe. Officials said the incident occurred after workers had left for the day but there weren’t any warning signs posted at the time.

“For whatever reason, at the end of the day, the workers failed to redesignate the area as unsafe,” Ventnor City Police Chief Douglas Biagi said. “An oversight which will not happen again.” 

Chief Biagi said no one involved in the incident notified police. His department later found out about the mishap from social media. 

“We would have put up temporary barricades,” he said. “In that two hour period it took us to actually get something in place, it could have been ten minutes.” 

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is managing the construction project. A spokesman called the incident unfortunate and said the subcontractor is now making sure additional caution signs are up when workers finish for the day. The spokesman also said it’s always best to avoid walking near pipes and similar structures on the beach. 

“There’s just too many things that can happen,” Chief Biagi said. 

The construction will likely finish later this week or early next week and it shouldn’t take long for the sand to become stable, according to officials.

Man Charged With ‘Sextortion' After Threatening Girls With Child Porn, Police Say

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What to Know

  • Ian Pisarchuk, 25, of Bensalem Township, Pennsylvania, allegedly contacted women and girls on Snapchat, told them he had naked pictures of them and threatened to post those photos online if they didn’t send him more explicit images.
  • Police said the victims, some of them underage, then sent him videos in fear that he’d post their nude images online. 
  • Bensalem Police also said Pisarchuk may have targeted a person who died by suicide in September of 2016.

A Bensalem man is accused of using Snapchat to threaten to post nude pictures and videos of underage girls to force them to send him more explicit photos. 

The investigation began in October 2020 when Bensalem Police received a report that a girl was being harassed by a user on the popular social media app Snapchat. The user was threatening to post naked pictures of the girl if she didn’t send him more nude photos. 

In February, Snapchat provided investigators with the IP address of the person who was trying to extort the girl. Detectives identified the user as 25-year-old Ian Pisarchuk of Bensalem, Pennsylvania. 

Ian Pisarchuk

On March 11, detectives went to Pisarchuk’s home and interviewed him. He allegedly admitted to using Snapchat to speak with girls and stated that he had been “forceful.” Police also found several photos and videos of naked women and girls on his cell phone, according to investigators. 

Pisarchuk allegedly contacted his victims, told them he had naked pictures of them and threatened to post those photos online if they didn’t send him more explicit images. Police said the victims, some of them underage, then sent him videos in fear that he’d post their nude images online. 

On Tuesday, police executed a search warrant at Pisarchuk’s home and seized several electronic devices.

Pisarchuck was arrested and charged with enticing a minor to produce child pornography, possession of child pornography, sexual extortion, stalking, unlawful contact with a minor, terroristic threats, dissemination of obscene/sexual material of a minor, corruption of minors and criminal use of a communication facility. 

He was arraigned with bail set at ten percent of two million dollars and was sent to Bucks County Prison. 

Bensalem Police also said Pisarchuk may have targeted a person who died by suicide in September of 2016. That person was harassed, threatened and extorted by an unknown Snapchat user in a manner similar to what Pisarchuk did to his victims, according to investigators. 

Police tracked the IP address of that Snapchat user to Kutztown University. While Pisarchuk attended Kutztown University between 2014 and 2018, investigators have not yet determined whether or not he was the same user involved in that case. 

NJ Police Given 60 Days to Release 1st Discipline Reports

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Law enforcement agencies in New Jersey were given a 60-day deadline to begin releasing police disciplinary records Wednesday, two days after the state’s Supreme Court upheld the directive ordering their publication.

Law enforcement agencies must publish reports covering major discipline imposed from June 15, 2020 —the date of the original directive — through the end of the year. Going forward, they will be required to publish reports for each calendar year no later than January 31 of the following year.

Under the court’s 7-0 ruling, officers who were disciplined before that and were promised that their names would not be released can ask a judge to block the public disclosure.

State Attorney General Gurbir Grewal ordered the release of the records in the wake of the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis, amid calls for more police transparency and accountability. Previously, the records have been treated as confidential.

The reports must identify officers who committed serious disciplinary violations resulting in termination, reduction in rank or grade or suspension of more than five days.

“By lifting the cloak of secrecy over our state’s police disciplinary process, we are not simply ensuring accountability for those who engage in misconduct; we are also demonstrating that the vast majority of law enforcement officers work hard and play by the rules,” Grewal said in a statement.

Lightning Strike Kills Man on NJ Golf Course

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What to Know

A 70-year-old man was struck and killed by lightning strike at a Burlington County, New Jersey, golf course.

The golfer — later identified by police as Florence’s Michael Ward — was at the Burlington Country Club off Burrs Road in Westampton Township Wednesday afternoon when he was struck by lightning.

Westhampton Township police arrived to find the 70-year-old golfer unconscious and not breathing near the 7th Hole around 3:45 p.m., police said Thursday. He was later pronounced dead at the scene.

“It was evident from the scene that the male had been struck by lightning,” police said in a news release.

It was the first deadly lightning strike in New Jersey since September 7, 2012, and the 14th since 2006, according to the National Lightning Safety Council.

Since 2006, there have been 11 golf-related lightning deaths in the U.S.

“Based on the past 10 years, the U.S. averages 5 fatalities through June 9th. This year set a record for the latest FIRST fatality of the year,” John Jenenius, a Lightning Safety Specialist with the National Lightning Safety Council, wrote. “Previously, the record was May 23rd, set 10 years ago in 2011.”

The deadly lightning strike occurred as powerful scattered storms passed through the region.

Officials also confirmed with NBC10 that a person was struck by lightning in Angola, Delaware, on Wednesday. They have not yet revealed that person’s condition. 

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Penn State Ex-President Spanier Reports to Jail Early in Sandusky Scandal

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What to Know

  • Former Penn State president Graham Spanier reported to jail early to begin serving his sentence in a case stemming from the Jerry Sandusky child sexual abuse scandal.
  • Spanier was supposed to report by July 9, but an inmate locator showed he was already in custody at a county jail several miles from the Penn State campus as of Wednesday.
  • A judge upheld Spanier’s sentence last month and ordered him to begin serving at least two months in the county jail for a single misdemeanor conviction of endangering the welfare of children.

Former Penn State president Graham Spanier has reported to jail early to begin serving his sentence for child endangerment in a case stemming from the Jerry Sandusky child sexual abuse scandal.

An online inmate locator shows that Spanier is in custody at Centre County Correctional Facility, several miles from the Penn State campus. It wasn’t immediately clear when Spanier reported to jail. Phone and email messages were left with jail officials on Wednesday. Spanier’s attorney declined comment.

A judge upheld Spanier’s sentence last month and ordered him to begin serving at least two months in the county jail by July 9 for a single misdemeanor conviction of endangering the welfare of children.

Former Penn State president Graham Spanier. Spanier reported to the Centre County Correctional Facility on June 7, 2021, to begin serving at least two months for child endangerment in a case stemming from the Jerry Sandusky child sexual abuse scandal.
Former Penn State president Graham Spanier reported to the Centre County Correctional Facility to begin serving at least two months for child endangerment in a case stemming from the Jerry Sandusky child sexual abuse scandal.

After Spanier is released, he will spend two months on house arrest with electronic monitoring.

Spanier was charged over his response to a 2001 report that Sandusky, a former Penn State assistant football coach, had been spotted showering alone with a boy in a team locker room.

Spanier has said the abuse of the boy was characterized to him as horseplay. He and other top administrators did not notify police, and Spanier wrote in an email at the time that “the only downside for us is if the message isn’t ‘heard’ and acted upon, and we then become vulnerable for not having reported it.”

Spanier was charged in 2012 and was convicted by a jury in 2017, but appeals had allowed him to stay out of jail.

Spanier, 72, did not testify at his trial, but spoke at sentencing, telling the judge that he regretted not intervening more forcefully.

Two other former Penn State administrators pleaded guilty to misdemeanor child endangerment and served similar jail sentences.

Sandusky is serving 30 to 60 years for sexually abusing children.


Woman Dies After Being Struck by Police Car in NJ

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A woman died after being struck by a police vehicle in Camden County, New Jersey, overnight.

The crash took place south of the intersection of Woodlynne and Mt. Ephraim avenues in Woodlynne around midnight and involved a Camden County police officer, county officials said.

The woman who was struck later died, the county said. The officer was taken to the hospital and was later released.

Police spent hours early Thursday morning investigating the wreck, which happened in a dark area of road, before clearing it ahead of the morning rush. At one point, a police vehicle could be seen being towed from the scene.

It wasn’t known if the officer had the police car lights or siren on at the time of the wreck.

The New Jersey Attorney General’s Office and New Jersey State Police are leading the investigation into exactly what happened, county officials said.

Philadelphia to Lift Indoor Mask Mandate on Friday, Ending COVID Restrictions

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What to Know

  • The city announced Wednesday that as of 12:01 a.m. Friday, June 11, Philadelphia will end its final two COVID restrictions: the indoor mask mandate as well as the 11 p.m. last call for restaurants.
  • The lifted restrictions apply to both fully vaccinated and unvaccinated city residents however, officials still strongly urge everyone to become fully vaccinated.
  • An average of 53 cases of COVID-19 have been identified per day in June in Philadelphia, the lowest number of cases since the start of the pandemic, according to the Health Department. 

After more than a year, Philadelphians will no longer have to wear masks indoors starting Friday as the city officially lifts all of its COVID restrictions.

The city announced Wednesday that as of 12:01 a.m. Friday, June 11, Philadelphia will end the indoor mask mandate as well as the 11 p.m. last call for restaurants.

The lifted restrictions apply to both fully vaccinated and unvaccinated city residents however, officials still strongly urge everyone to become fully vaccinated. Those who received their final dose of the COVID vaccine at least two weeks ago are considered fully vaccinated. 

“For nearly fifteen months, the City of Philadelphia has had restrictions in place to protect each other, and I have no doubt that these restrictions saved countless lives,” Mayor Jim Kenney said. “But Friday will be a day that we’ve all been looking forward to: getting back to doing the things that we love.”

An average of 53 cases of COVID-19 have been identified per day in June in Philadelphia, the lowest number of cases since the start of the pandemic, according to the Health Department. 

“Lifting the requirement for vaccinated people to wear masks indoors doesn’t mean that we are totally past COVID-19,” Acting Health Commissioner Dr. Cheryl Bettigole said. “Dozens of Philadelphians are still being diagnosed with COVID-19 every day, which means that more of us still need to get vaccinated.” 

As of Monday, the Health Department reported that at least 836,370 Philadelphians have received at least one dose of the COVID vaccine and 645,568 Philadelphians were fully vaccinated. That’s 67.4% and 52% of Philadelphia adults respectively. According to the CDC, 66.3% of Philadelphians over the age of 64 are fully vaccinated. 

Earlier in the week, the city announced it was putting up hundreds of thousands of dollars to reward people who have already received a COVID-19 vaccine while also encouraging people who are hesitant to get vaccinated.

“I urge everyone who has not been vaccinated to join the more than 800,000 fellow Philadelphians so we can continue to move forward from the pandemic,” Mayor Jim Kenney said. 

Philadelphia will still require masks to be worn indoors in select settings, including but not limited to healthcare institutions and events such as vaccine clinics and blood drives, prisons, shelters, adult day programs, trains, buses, taxis, rideshare vehicles, indoor schools, camps and early childhood education. 

The mask requirement will also remain in place for all Philadelphia court facilities and procedures until further notice. 

Philadelphia’s first COVID restrictions were put in place on March 12, 2020. Non-essential businesses in the city were closed on March 16, 2020.

1 Dead, 2 Wounded in Shooting Outside Upper Darby Bar

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At least one person died and two were wounded during a shooting outside an Upper Darby Township bar early Thursday morning.

Police said someone opened fire outside Rudy’s Tavern on the 7100 block of Marshall Road, striking the three victims. The shooting drew a large police presence, with various patrol cruisers and officers arriving to the scene.

Tom Clark said his 22-year-old cousin was the man killed in the gunfire, though police have not yet confirmed that. He said he was concerned the shooting may have stemmed from some sort of argument.

“Nowadays, shooters are, for the most part, cowards,” Clark said. “You could fight, get it over with and go home – that’s it, end of story and you live to see another day. But in this day and time, everybody’s carrying guns, anywhere from 13 to 62.”

The bar is located along a stretch of road surrounded by single-family homes and apartments. Residents could be seen looking on, with some telling NBC10 the bar is a troubled spot in the neighborhoods.

Police did not immediately announce any arrests.

In NJ Gov.'s Race, Murphy Runs on Record, Ciattarelli Asks Are You Better Off?

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New Jersey’s gubernatorial election came into focus Wednesday, with Democratic Gov. Phil Murphy defending his progressive record and Republican Jack Ciattarelli homing in on affordability and taxes.

Ciattarelli emerged Tuesday as the winner in a four-way GOP primary, while Murphy won his uncontested race.

The election is just one of two for governor in the nation this year — along with Virginia. The races stand out because they occur in odd years and traditionally invite national scrutiny since they occur just after presidential elections. Murphy is trying to buck a more than four-decade pattern of Democrats failing to win reelection. Ciattarelli faces strong headwinds, too, with Republicans outnumbered by Democrats by 1 million registered voters.

Republicans nominated a candidate in Ciattarelli who was skeptical of former President Donald Trump early on before eventually embracing his policies and, as he explained during a radio interview recently, bought 3,000 Trump lawn signs and voted for Trump.

The former president, who has golf clubs in New Jersey and regularly visited his property in Bedminster during his administration, has proven unpopular in the state, losing it twice.

Ciattarelli, a former Assembly member and founder of a small business, fended off two primary opponents who adhered closely to the former president. In a victory speech, Ciattarelli didn’t mention the previous president by name but identified himself as a Lincoln and Reagan Republican who believes in tolerance and “mutual respect.”

Murphy was uncontested on the Democratic ballot, which saw turnout fall from four years ago when there were six candidates vying for the nomination, according to preliminary, unofficial tallies.

Murphy has a positive approval rating in polls and has gotten good grades for his handling of the COVID-19 outbreak. He also has a long list of accomplishments given the Democratic control of the Legislature. He ticked some of them off Tuesday: recreational marijuana legalization, offshore wind credits, a new film and TV tax credit and the implementation of sports betting, the push for which started before Murphy took office.

Ciattarelli shifted gears to general election mode Tuesday night, focusing on affordability and New Jersey’s reputation for high taxes, reviving a Ronald Reagan line from his campaign against Jimmy Carter in 1980 and hoping to tap into voter frustration with the incumbent.

“Are you better off today than you were four years ago?” Ciattarelli asked.

Murphy posed his own question: do voters want to go back to reduced funding for women’s health care and lower taxes for the wealthy?

Typically candidates will tack toward the middle in a general election campaign, but New Jersey has shifted to the left, making it all but impossible for Murphy to abandon the left-leaning policies he pursued during his first term, according to experts.

“He can’t run away from that label,” said Brigid Harrison a political science professor at Montclair State University and one-time Democratic candidate for Congress in 2020. “It’s how he governs. It’s how he’s going to be governing. It doesn’t make a lot of sense to couch his administration as moderate.”

Election Day is Nov. 2.

Eating Cicadas? Brood X Emergence Inspires NJ Students to Take a Bite

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One group of New Jersey high school students are conducting more than just research during the historic resurgence of the Brood X cicada — daring to cook and munch on these timely critters.

The insect-eating club at Princeton High School was founded last year by students Matthew Livingston and Mulin Huan, both currently in their junior year.

“The club was founded in mid-2020. My high school research is on sustainable protein and alternative protein sources, so I decided to work with insects,” said Livingston in a recent interview with NBC New York.

Initially working on crickets, Livingston switched up his studies to include Brood X, a group of periodical cicadas that emerge from the ground in 17-year cycles.

Currently, these insects have been popping up from the ground in various parts of the country, such as Delaware, Maryland, Ohio, New York and New Jersey. The last time residents witnessed this group was in 2004.

Although rather large and noisy, the Brood X bugs are completely harmless to humans, feast on tree sap and play an important role in the environment.

“These insects drink tree sap from deep underground, bringing nutrients back to the surface and aerating the soil as they come up from the ground. The (cicada) strategy is to overwhelm anything that could possibly eat it,” said Princeton High School teacher, Mark Eastburn.

For those wondering why eat cicadas, or any bugs at all, these students are hoping to change mindsets on how Americans see cuisine.

“People have asked, ‘How can this be a sustainable protein if they only come up every 17 years?’ It’s a valid point, but this is an entry to other species like crickets, mealworms and black soldier fly. Insects and crustaceans are very close relatives, so it’s not that large of a shift,” said Eastburn.

Entomologists often call cicadas the, ‘”Shrimp of the Land” or “Tree Shrimp.” With cicadas feasting on tree sap, crickets eating chicken feed and mealworms digesting cornmeal, Eastburn argues that these critters are eating clean foods as opposed to lobsters or crabs that are mostly bottom feeders.

However, it’s important to note that the Food and Drug Administration tweeted out last week to avoid consuming cicadas if you have a seafood allergy.

The insect-eating club has already hosted a couple of cooking events in Princeton, NJ. To Huan, it’s not just about sharing recipes. Edible insects can help preserve the environment.

“With cows and other meats, we not only have to deforest to support these animals, but we have to further deforest to grow crops to feed them. Insects don’t have that issue, and take up much less land,” said Huan.

For those daring to try cicada dishes, there is a whole cookbook by University of Maryland graduate Jenna Jadin. Originally crafted during the 2004 Brood X emergence, the book is full of recipes from soft-shell to Shanghai-style cuisine.

And for others who may be curious but not ready to jump right in, these New Jersey students suggest cookies or brownies using ground up cicada powder.

Lawmakers Take Last Steps to End Declaration, Extend Waivers

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Pennsylvania’s Republican-controlled Legislature on Thursday voted to end Gov. Tom Wolf’s pandemic disaster emergency declaration and to extend hundreds of regulatory waivers his administration approved over the last 15 months.

A bill to extend the regulatory waivers across a wide swath of government functions and the economy would keep the regulations suspended until Sept. 30, unless Wolf’s administration ends the waivers sooner.

It passed the House and Senate unanimously, but still required approval from Wolf, a Democrat.

A key component of a disaster declaration is a governor’s authority to waive a regulation.

However, the resolution to end Wolf’s disaster emergency declaration drew bitter recriminations from Democrats, who accused Republicans of undertaking an experiment that could hamstring a state response to a resurgence of COVID-19 and risks losing millions in federal emergency food aid for the poorest families.

The resolution passed the chambers with every Republican in favor of it and all but nine Democrats against it. It does not require a governor’s approval.

The Wolf administration maintains that dissolving the disaster emergency does not affect a health secretary’s disease-prevention authority to issue mask-wearing and stay-at-home orders or shut down schools and non-essential businesses.

Republicans and Democrats also quarreled over the legality of the resolution, since the state has not yet certified the results of last month’s referendum that gave lawmakers broad new authority over extending and ending disaster emergencies.

Relive the Stunning ‘Ring of Fire' Solar Eclipse Over the Philly Region

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SkyForce10 captured the partial “Ring of Fire” solar eclipse Thursday morning over Philadelphia.

The event, known as an annular solar eclipse, occurs when the moon is too far from Earth to block out the entire sun, leaving the sun peeking out over the Moon’s disk in a “ring of fire,“ according to NASA.

On the morning of Thursday, June 10, skygazers in parts of North America got to witness the partial solar eclipse. The moon passed in front of the sun starting around just after daybreak in the Philadelphia region.

Since looking directly at the sun with the naked eye isn’t safe, SkyForce10 and other cameras gave viewers a glimpse of the show in the sky. The last sliver of the moon passed over the sun above the Philadelphia region around 6:30 a.m.

Clouds obscured the eclipse in parts of the Philadelphia region, however, you could see some of it above the Jersey Shore.

Other parts of North America got a better and longer look at the eclipse.


Homes Go Up in Flames in Montgomery County

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At least three Montgomery County homes went up in flames Thursday afternoon.

SkyForce10 was over the scene of the large fire along Cardin Place near Sunderland Drive in Eagleville before 1 p.m.

We have seen an active fire and explosion at one property and at least two other homes on fire. The smoke could be seen from miles away.

Police officers — including SWAT — and firefighters could be seen responding to the incident.

Firefighters were pouring water on the flames, causing thick white smoke.

People should avoid the area, which is not far from Ridge Pike and Eagleville Road.

This story is developing and will be updated.

Boy, 13, and Man Shot in Northern Liberties Federal Donuts

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A 13-year-old boy and a man were shot inside a Federal Donuts store in Philadelphia Thursday afternoon, police said.

The shooting around 1 p.m. on the 700 block of N. 7th Street in Northern Liberties left the boy with two gunshot wounds to his leg and the adult with multiple gunshots throughout the body, police said.

Paramedics rushed both to Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, where the boy was stable but the man was in critical condition, police said.

Police did not immediately make an arrest.  

There are additional resources for people or communities that have endured gun violence in Philadelphia. Further information can be found here.

Cyclist Struck by Two Cars in Deadly Accident on Broad Street

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Two cars hit and killed a cyclist crossing Broad Street on Lehigh Avenue on Wednesday night.

A Dodge Challenger traveling northbound first struck the cyclist, who was traveling westbound, sending him to the southbound lanes of Broad Street. A Nissan Rogue traveling southbound on Broad Street then hit the cyclist once again, according to the Philadelphia Police Department.

The Philadelphia Fire Department Medic Unit transported the cyclist, a 29-year-old Black male, to Temple University Hospital where he was pronounced dead at 9:25 p.m., police said.

No arrests have been made, according to the police. The investigation remains active and ongoing with the Accident Investigation Division.

This is not the first time a motorist struck and killed a cyclist in Philadelphia this year. Fatalities and serious injuries in bike crashes are actually fairly common in the city.

Between 2014 and 2018, 19 people were killed and 64 people were seriously injured in crashes where at least one cyclist was involved, according to data from the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation.

Eighty percent of all such incidents occur on only 12% of Philadelphia streets, including Broad Street where the man was killed on Wednesday. Several other people have been seriously injured in bike crashes on Broad Street in recent years, according to Vision Zero, a data-driven strategy to reduce traffic deaths and injuries.

Although cyclists only comprise two percent of people involved in crashes, they make up four percent of people killed, according to data PennDOT collected from 2015 to 2019.

Philly Classifies Dirt Bikes and ATVs as Illegal for Street Use, Closing Loophole

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Riding dirt bikes and all-terrain vehicles like dune buggies on Philadelphia streets is now illegal.

In a unanimous vote on Thursday, Philadelphia City Council amended the traffic code to define dirt bikes and dune buggies as illegal vehicles. The change closes a loophole that prevented Philadelphia police from confiscating the vehicles, according to a release from Councilmember Alan Domb’s office. Domb cosponsored the legislation with Councilmembers Mark Squilla and Derek Green.

Residents have long been at odds with dirt bike and ATV riders using city streets. Community meetings about the issue were often animated with homeowners complaining about excessive noise and confrontations with riders.

One high-profile incident between a driver and dirt bike rider in South Philadelphia this March resulted in criminal charges. Cell phone video showed the rider beating a driver and throwing concrete at the car after a minor accident. The rider was ultimately charged with aggravated assault.

Police have periodically cracked down on the riding, sometimes holding sting operations, but the department’s policy on vehicle chases makes catching up to riders difficult.

Members of the street riding community have said they’re just riding for fun and trying to get out of neighborhoods riddled with violent crime. In an interview late last year, two riders said crack downs won’t stop them.

“I’ve been doing this for years. This is my stress reliever. I’m not going to stop. I’m never going to stop,” one rider, who did not identify himself, said at the time. He added that if the ATV was confiscated, he’d just go buy another.

City council and the riding community are exploring creating an ATV and dirt bike park somewhere in the city. Domb said it would be some time before that could happen as the city would need to work out not only finding land and constructing the park, but also determine ownership and set up a system for registering and transporting the off-road vehicles to the park.

Senate Confirms Zahid Quraishi as 1st Muslim American Federal Judge in US History

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The Senate on Thursday voted 81-16 to confirm Zahid Quraishi as U.S. District Judge for the District of New Jersey, making him the first Muslim American federal judge in the country’s history.

Qurashi will be “the first Muslim American to serve as an Article III judge in our history,” Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., said on the Senate floor ahead of the vote.

The son of Pakistani immigrants, Quraishi was born in New York City and raised in New Jersey, where he earned his law degree from Rutgers Law School. 

Read the full story on NBCNews.com here.

NJ Toddler Dies After Fall From Window, Getting Mauled by Family Dogs

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What to Know

  • A 3-year-old boy in New Jersey died after falling out a window of his home and landing in his backyard, where he was mauled by the family’s dogs, authorities say
  • Elizabeth police responded to a home on South 5th Street shortly after 5:25 p.m. Wednesday and found the 3-year-old victim with serious injuries; the boy was pronounced dead at a hospital an hour later
  • An investigation revealed that the dogs, which belonged to the child’s family, were in the fenced yard at the time of the incident

A 3-year-old boy in New Jersey died after falling out a window of his home and landing in his backyard, where he was mauled by the family’s dogs, authorities say.

Members of the Elizabeth Police Department responded to a home on South 5th Street shortly after 5:25 p.m. Wednesday and found the toddler with serious injuries, acting Union County Prosecutor Lyndsay V. Ruotolo and Elizabeth Police Chief Giacomo Sacca and Police Director Earl Graves jointly announced Thursday. 

The child was taken to Trinitas Regional Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead shortly after 6:30 p.m. 

An investigation revealed that the dogs, which belonged to the child’s family, were in the fenced yard at the time of the incident.

Representatives of a local animal control organization responded to the scene and secured the dogs, which were transported to another location.

No criminal charges in connection to this incident have been filed at this time.

Authorities urge anyone with additional information to contact Prosecutor’s Office Detective Richard Acosta at 908-347-0404 or Detective Michael Tambini at 908-472-4301.

Reputed Mobster Sentenced for Assaulting ‘Real Housewives' Husband in NJ

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What to Know

  • A reputed mobster who assaulted the then-boyfriend and now husband of a former “Real Housewives of New Jersey” cast member in exchange for a deeply discounted lavish wedding reception is now headed to federal prison.
  • John Perna received a 30-month sentence Thursday. The 44-year-old Cedar Grove man must also pay $17,816 in restitution.
  • Prosecutors say Perna is a member of the Lucchese organized crime family and carried out the assault in July 2015.

A reputed mobster who assaulted the then-boyfriend and now husband of a former “Real Housewives of New Jersey” cast member in exchange for a deeply discounted lavish wedding reception has been sentenced to more than two years in federal prison.

John Perna, 44, of Cedar Grove, New Jersey, must also pay $17,816 in restitution as part of the 30-month sentence he received Thursday, according to federal prosecutors. He had pleaded guilty last December to committing a violent crime in aid of racketeering activity.

Prosecutors allege the former husband of cast member Dina Manzo, Thomas Manzo, hired Perna to assault his ex-wife’s then boyfriend. Perna is part of the Lucchese organized crime family and carried out the assault with a member of his crew in July 2015, prosecutors said.

Authorities said a month later, Perna held a wedding reception for 330 guests at Thomas Manzo’s Brownstone Restaurant in Paterson for “a fraction of the price.” Many of the guests were members of the Lucchese crime family, according to prosecutors.

Thomas Manzo has pleaded not guilty to conspiracy and committing a violent crime in aid of racketeering activity. He is awaiting trial.

Dina Manzo left the Bravo reality series in 2015 and she married Dave Cantin in June 2017.


Pa. House Republicans Unveil Plan to Change Voting Laws

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An ambitious Republican proposal to revamp Pennsylvania election law was unveiled Thursday, a 149-page bill that would change deadlines, adopt new rules for early voting, alter mail-in ballot procedures and mandate IDs for all in-person voters.

The measure produced by State Government Committee Chairman Seth Grove is likely to encounter severe pushback from Democrats in a state where both parties are competitive in statewide races.

Although Pennsylvania’s closely watched 2020 election was carried out smoothly, many Republicans have called for election-law changes in the wake of former President Donald Trump’s baseless claims of widespread voting fraud.

“This is not a view of the Republicans or the Democrats,” said Grove, R-York, whose committee conducted hearings on the topic this spring. “This is a view of what we heard through 10 extensive hearings from all sides.”

The bill was introduced by Grove and House Republican leaders with just three weeks left before lawmakers are due to wrap up business and head home for the summer.

The detailed, complicated legislation will need approval by majorities of both Republican-majority chambers as well as Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf’s signature to become law.

Wolf press secretary Lyndsay Kensinger said the bill aimed to install new barriers against voting, in effect silencing people’s voices and turning ballot access into a political weapon.

“This proposal is not about protecting voter rights or increasing access,” Kensinger said. “It is an extremist proposal to try and undermine confidence in our election system, which led to the assault on the U.S. Capitol. They don’t like the outcome of the November election and now they are retaliating against the voters by pushing a proposal disguised as ‘election integrity.’”

The state’s counties, which run the nuts and bolts of elections, have urged lawmakers to pass justtwo specific changes to mail-in ballot applications and counting procedures by the end of June. They have said those changes to allow the counting of mail-in ballots before election day and to push back the deadline for applying for an absentee ballot will fix most of their election administration headaches in time for the Nov. 2 general election.

Grove’s bill was not negotiated with legislative Democrats or Wolf, leaving it to GOP leaders to hammer out an agreement in the coming weeks amid a busy period of final state budget negotiations.

“We plan on reviewing this 150-page rewrite of our election laws carefully since it was done with no Democratic input and it appears to make voting more complicated, not easier,” said House Democratic Leader Joanna McClinton. “Improving ballot access for all voters in a bipartisan way like we did in 2019 should be the standard for any election changes.”

The legislation would provide new restrictions on drop box locations for mail-in ballots, improve access to polling places for voters with disabilities and let counties begin to start counting mail-in ballots five days before election day.

The deadline to register to vote would change from 15 days to 30 days prior to an election, as had been the case before a 2019 law change. Mail-in ballots would have to be requested 15 days before election day.

Drop boxes for mail-in ballots would only be allowed for seven days before an election, and available for use during the hours of 7 a.m.-8 p.m. Counties must have at least one drop-box site and can add one for each 100,000 people who live in the county. They must be monitored by election inspectors from each major political party.

Early voting in person would be permitted starting in 2025.

The proposal includes rules for fixing problems on mail-in ballots envelopes, such as lack of signatures or dates. It would put in place new rules for how lists of registered voters are maintained.

Grove’s bill would also require audits of voting results and establish a Bureau of Election Audits in the state auditor general’s office with subpoena power to complete multiple audits, including “result-confirming audits” that will be due on the third Friday after every vote.

Counties would have to issue “scannable and durable” voter registration cards that those voting in-person would be required to show.

The bill would also constrain the Department of State’s guidance to counties regarding election procedures, limiting the agency to explicit duties regarding elections that are outlined in state law.

It would ban counties from accepting private donations aimed to help them run elections, as occurred last year. Any such donations would have to be distributed by the Department of State and be available to all counties.

The bill would end the current practice of letting people sign up to permanently receive mail-in ballots. Instead, voters would have to request one for each election.

It also boosts the fines for a variety of election law violations and raises the pay for judges of the election from the the current range of $75-$200 to $175-$300.

Grove’s committee is scheduled to take up the bill on Tuesday.

Booming Tax Collections Leave NJ With $10.1B Surplus, Decisions to Make

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What to Know

  • New Jersey will carry a $10.1 billion surplus into the new fiscal year that starts July 1, a stark turnaround from last year when Democratic Gov. Phil Murphy sought to borrow almost $10 billion because of a revenue downturn.
  • The $10.1 billion figure is nearly $4 billion higher than the Murphy administration had forecast earlier this year. The surge in revenue comes as lawmakers and Murphy face a June 30 deadline to enact a balanced budget.
  • Now they have to decide how to allocate the money.

New Jersey will carry a $10.1 billion surplus — about 25% of the total budget — into the new fiscal year that starts July 1, a stark turnaround from last year when Democratic Gov. Phil Murphy sought to borrow almost $10 billion because of a revenue downturn.

State Treasurer Elizabeth Muoio delivered the news to the Democrat-led state Senate Budget Committee in writing on Thursday, just a day after sending it to their Assembly counterparts.

The $10.1 billion figure is nearly $4 billion higher than the Murphy administration had forecast earlier this year.

“Thanks to a remarkable two-month revenue collection surge – an April and May ‘surprise’ like no other – state tax collections in Fiscal Year 2021 (FY21) are hitting historic highs,” Muoio told lawmakers.

The surge in revenue comes just as lawmakers and Murphy face a June 30 deadline to enact a balanced budget. The extra cash confronts lawmakers and the governor with a tantalizing question in an election year: how do you spend the money?

The answer, though, isn’t clear yet. Lawmakers and the governor have to negotiate those details.

The governor will “invest in our public education system, reduce the burden of health care costs, and provide additional tax cuts to New Jersey’s growing middle class,” Murphy’s spokesperson Alyana Alfaro Post said in an email.

Senate Budget Committee Chairman Paul Sarlo said in a phone interview that he wants to use the funds to pay down state debt, increase the state’s payment for the public pension and make longer-term investments.

“The last thing we want to do is create a bunch of new programs,” he said.

The revenue updates are typically delivered in person, and lawmakers have a chance to ask questions of Treasury officials, but the Assembly and Senate hearings were both canceled. No reason was given.

Republican lawmakers on Thursday fumed about the cancellations, saying they showed a lack of transparency. As to how to spend the money, Republican state senators in a remote news conference suggested they could get behind several proposals, including increasing the public pension payment and replenishing the hard-hit unemployment insurance trust fund.

They also suggested considering some kind of giveback to taxpayers, though exactly what that would look like isn’t clear.

“We need to have the conversation about how to return the money to the taxpayers,” Republican state Sen. Steve Oroho said.

The cause for the higher-than-expected revenues stems from federal stimulus checks in December and March, quick vaccine development and rollout and a soaring stock market, according to Muoio.

It’s election year in New Jersey, with Murphy seeking a second term. This week, GOP voters picked Jack Ciattarelli, a former Assembly member and the founder of a medical publishing company, to be their nominee.

All 120 seats in the Legislature are also on the ballot.

The current fiscal year’s budget got a $4 billion infusion from bonds that Murphy and lawmakers passed legislation to take on. The governor had originally sought nearly $10 billion in borrowing authority, but eventually took out just over $4 billion because of fallen revenues stemming from COVID-19’s effect on the economy.

New Jersey’s rosy revenue picture reflects a dynamic in other states, as well. Spending plans for the budget year starting July 1 are up 10% or more in states from Florida and Maryland to Colorado, Utah and Washington.

In a Reading Terminal Market First, Filipino-Fusion Eatery Set to Debut

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Reading Terminal Market is opening what is thought to be the historic Philadelphia venue’s first Filipino concept this month, reports the Philadelphia Business Journal

Tambayan, which will offer a Filipino-fusion menu of breakfast, all-day fare and desserts, is anticipated to open in late June at the market space formerly occupied by Wursthaus Schmitz. 

The concept aims to serve up flavors and ingredients unique to the Philippines. Many dishes will center around the use of ube, a purple yam native to the Southeast Asian country. Tambayan’s full menu will be available for both takeout and delivery. 

The restaurant comes from Owner Kathy Mirano, who immigrated to the U.S. from Taal, Batangas in the Philippines 24 years ago, reports PBJ.com. Mirano has 21 years of experience working as a server and manager at Greek concept Olympia Gyro, a fellow eatery in Reading Terminal. 

Get More: PBJ.com has a statement from Reading Terminal Market CEO Annie Allman about the deep roots going into the new eatery.

Get the latest business news from NBC10’s partners at the Philadelphia Business Journal.

Gov. Tom Wolf Signs Bill to Extend Pa. Pandemic Regulatory Waivers

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What to Know

  • Gov. Tom Wolf is extending hundreds of waivers of regulations that his administration approved over the last 15 months under the authority of his pandemic disaster emergency declaration that lawmakers voted to end.
  • The bill the Democratic governor signed Friday allows the waivers to last through Sept. 30, unless Wolf’s administration ends them sooner.
  • The Republican-controlled Legislature approved the bill unanimously, at Wolf’s urging, as a companion to the resolution to end the disaster emergency declaration that passed nearly along partisan lines.

Gov. Tom Wolf on Friday signed legislation to extend hundreds of waivers of regulations that his administration approved over the last 15 months under the authority of his pandemic disaster emergency declaration that lawmakers voted to end.

The bill allows the waivers to last through Sept. 30, unless Wolf’s administration ends them sooner.

The Republican-controlled Legislature approved the bill unanimously, at Wolf’s urging, as a companion to the Republican-penned resolution to end the disaster emergency declaration that passed nearly along partisan lines.

Republicans characterized their move to end the declaration as carrying out the will of the people in last month’s statewide referendum. In it, voters approved a Republican-backed constitutional amendment to give lawmakers broad new power over extending and ending disaster emergencies.

The resolution won’t take effect until next week, at least, according to Wolf’s administration. Four counties had yet to submit signed certifications of their election results from last month, and those were expected next week, according to Wolf’s Department of State.

The suspended regulations cover a wide swath of government requirements, including licensing, inspections and training.

The Wolf administration maintains that dissolving the disaster emergency does not affect a health secretary’s disease-prevention authority to issue mask-wearing and stay-at-home orders or shut down schools and nonessential businesses.

Wolf, in any case, has ended those measures, as the vaccine has stemmed the spread of the virus. The exception is a mask-wearing mandate for unvaccinated adults that tracks federal guidance, to stay in place until June 28 or 70% of adults are vaccinated, whichever is first.

From Mask Up to Mask Off: Philly Lifts Indoor COVID Mask Mandate

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What to Know

  • As of 12:01 a.m. Friday, June 11, Philadelphia has lifted its final two COVID restrictions: the indoor mask mandate as well as the 11 p.m. last call for restaurants.
  • The lifted restrictions apply to both fully vaccinated and unvaccinated city residents however, officials still strongly urge everyone to become fully vaccinated and to take precautions if not vaccinated.
  • Masks must still be worn indoors in select settings, including, but not limited to, health care institutions and events such as vaccine clinics and blood drives, prisons, shelters, adult day programs, trains, buses, taxis, rideshare vehicles, indoor schools, camps and early childhood education.  

After months of masking up, Philadelphians no longer have to wear face masks indoors starting Friday as the city officially lifted its remaining COVID restrictions.

The city announced Wednesday that as of 12:01 a.m. Friday, June 11, Philadelphia would end the indoor mask mandate as well as the 11 p.m. last call for restaurants — the last two major remnants of coronavirus restrictions.

“For nearly fifteen months, the City of Philadelphia has had restrictions in place to protect each other, and I have no doubt that these restrictions saved countless lives,” Mayor Jim Kenney said. “But Friday will be a day that we’ve all been looking forward to: getting back to doing the things that we love.”

The lifted restrictions apply to both fully vaccinated and unvaccinated people, however, people yet to become fully vaccinated are urged to continue to wear face masks in public places.

Officials still strongly urge everyone to become fully vaccinated. Those who received their final dose of the COVID vaccine at least two weeks ago are considered fully vaccinated. 

The news was greeted by joy by some employees. One worker at a South Philly restaurant even tore up a mask required sign hours after the mask mandate lifted.

An average of 53 cases of COVID-19 have been identified per day in June in Philadelphia, the lowest number of cases since the start of the pandemic, according to the Health Department. 

“Lifting the requirement for vaccinated people to wear masks indoors doesn’t mean that we are totally past COVID-19,” Acting Health Commissioner Dr. Cheryl Bettigole said. “Dozens of Philadelphians are still being diagnosed with COVID-19 every day, which means that more of us still need to get vaccinated.” 

As of Monday, the Health Department reported that at least 836,370 Philadelphians have received at least one dose of the COVID vaccine and 645,568 Philadelphians were fully vaccinated. That’s 67.4% and 52% of Philadelphia adults respectively. According to the CDC, 66.3% of Philadelphians over the age of 64 are fully vaccinated. 

Earlier in the week, the city announced it was putting up hundreds of thousands of dollars to reward people who have already received a COVID-19 vaccine while also encouraging people who are hesitant to get vaccinated.

“I urge everyone who has not been vaccinated to join the more than 800,000 fellow Philadelphians so we can continue to move forward from the pandemic,” Mayor Jim Kenney said. 

Philadelphia will still require masks to be worn indoors in select settings, including, but not limited to, health care institutions and events such as vaccine clinics and blood drives, prisons, shelters, adult day programs, trains, buses, taxis, rideshare vehicles, indoor schools, camps and early childhood education. 

The mask requirement will also remain in place for all Philadelphia court facilities and procedures until further notice. 

Philadelphia’s first COVID restrictions were put in place on March 12, 2020. Nonessential businesses in the city were closed on March 16, 2020.

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Get a Look Inside Phillies Legend Cole Hamels' $2.5M Delco Mansion

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Heidi, Cole Hamels is selling his beautiful Delco home originally appeared on NBC Sports Philadelphia

Some Phillies fans have been clamoring for the team to bring back franchise legend Cole Hamels for a one-year deal to shore up the rotation.

But Hamels’ latest move isn’t exactly encouraging to those who want Hollywood back in the area.

Hamels and his wife Heidi have listed their beautiful Newtown Square mansion for sale, according to Realtor.com, as they “look for a new home base.”

The 9,720-square-foot house has six bedrooms, seven full bathrooms, and half bathroooms, along with a top-of-the-line kitchen, a home gym, a wine room, a media room, and an outdoor area featuring a pool, patio, and lawn. The outdoor area also has a covered dining area with an outdoor fireplace.

It’s a house befitting a World Series champion.

Hamels and his wife are asking for $2,495,000 right now, so if anyone has any spare pocket change, please send it my way as I save up for this spot. Every little bit counts.

Go to NBCSPhilly.com for a look at some real nice photos of the place.

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Man's Body Discovered in Bombed Out Eagleville Home After Police Standoff

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The man who confronted police with a gun during a code enforcement check at his Eagleville, Pennsylvania, home died in an explosive house fire, authorities in Montgomery County said Friday.

Thomas Razzi’s home along Cardin Place was lit ablaze Thursday afternoon. The fire caused a number of explosions that allowed the fire to intensify and spread to two neighboring homes.

The 66-year-old’s body was discovered overnight by investigators and was positively identified by the Montgomery County medical examiner during an autopsy, prosecutors said. The cause and manner of Razzi’s death is pending.

burned home
This home along Cardin Place was reduced to rubble after a fire and explosions on Thursday, June 10, 2021.

Prosecutors on Friday released new details about the moments that led up to Razzi’s fiery death.

Just before noon Thursday, neighbors saw Razzi chasing a Lower Providence code enforcement officer with a gun, prosecutors said. They called 911 for help. The code officer visited Razzi’s home to check up on a hoarding-related violation, prosecutors said.

When police arrived, they found Razzi outside his home. He was unarmed, prosecutors said. He ran back into his house. A short time later, officers heard gunfire and a series of explosions. Prosecutors said gunfire was not exchanged with the man. Police ran into neighboring homes to rescue three children and evacuated the neighborhood.

The fire quickly grew and destroyed two additional homes. Three neighboring properties also sustained damage, authorities said.

The code enforcement officer was hospitalized with minor injuries, prosecutors said. They have since been released.

Local, county, state, and federal authorities have launched a joint investigation into the incident. Initial evidence shows Razzi was making illegal fireworks inside the home. Authorities believe the chemicals used for the fireworks as well as ammunition for guns Razzi owned caused the explosions.

Neighbors said Thursday that they were concerned with Razzi’s mental health over the past two weeks. “He said there’s no reason for me to leave if I’m going to be sick,” neighbor Elsayed Elsayed said.

The investigation is ongoing.


Timeline: How Man Suspected in 6 Murders Was on the Street

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What to Know

  • Keith Gibson was arrested after allegedly attacking a Rite Aid clerk in Delaware during a robbery. Murder charges have been approved for his alleged killing of a North Philadelphia Dunkin’ store manager.
  • Gibson was arrested in Philadelphia in February for violating his probation on a Delaware manslaughter conviction. Authorities in both places asked that he remain jailed, but he was released after a Delaware judge sentenced him to time served.
  • Police are investigating whether he is responsible for at least six killings in both states, including that of his mother. Three of the killings would have happened after the Delaware judge allowed his release.

Despite pleas from prosecutors, probation officers , and police in two states to keep a convicted killer locked up, a Delaware judge authorized the release of the man who is now being investigated in at least six more slayings.

A probation violation report obtained by NBC10 shows that the Delaware Department of Corrections in early February told a judge that Keith Gibson, 39, was violent, had violated his probation by traveling to Philadelphia and that police there had indicated he was the prime suspect in his mother’s murder.

The DOC asked that Gibson be sentenced to 6 ½ years in prison for his violation. The judge, whom the DOC said was Vivian Medinilla, instead sentenced him to 31 days, time served, in April. Four of the murders Gibson is linked to happened in May and June. Two happened earlier, in January.

Medinilla’s office did not respond to a request for comment from NBC10.

Late Friday, DOC spokesperson Jason Miller said that during an April 27 sentencing, Gibson’s public defender “cited new factors” asking for time served, “including that Gibson had prospects for stable housing, a job, and community supports upon release.”

Without objection from probation and parole officials, the judge accepted the public defender’s recommendation for time served and placed him on 18 months of probation, Miller said.

Gibson was convicted of manslaughter in 2010 and released last year. He was on supervised release and was not to leave Delaware. However, in February, around the time of his mother’s death, Philadelphia police arrested him, though they could only find that he was violating probation by being in the city.

Philadelphia Police Chief Inspector Frank Vanore said that Gibson’s mother was shot dead at her place of work and that neighbors had brought up Gibson’s name, but investigators did not recover a gun at the time, nor was there video evidence of a suspect.

Gibson was eventually sent back to Delaware.

Philadelphia District Attorney Larry Krasner acknowledged that police did not have enough probable cause at the time to arrest Gibson for his mother’s death, but he said both the police department and his office attempted to aid the Delaware DOC to keep Gibson off the street.

The Delaware DOC document shows corrections officials told Medinilla that “early reports” suggested Gibson’s mother had told friends and family members that if anything happened to her, her son would be responsible.

They also told Medinilla that Gibson had an “extensive history of violence” – including 29 felony arrests and nine convictions – a documented history of anger issues, and that they felt he posed a threat to himself and the community.

The warnings did not sway Medinilla in accepting the public defender’s recommendation.

“I think it is fair to say that there arguably has been a systemic failure when someone with a record this terrible, who has completed a lengthy sentence for homicide, is under very serious consideration for killing his mother – and he remained on the street,” Philadelphia DA Krasner said.

Krasner’s office has approved murder charges against Gibson in the North Philadelphia killing of 40-year-old Dunkin’ manager Christine Lugo over the weekend. They are awaiting his extradition out of Delaware.

Officials have indicated there may be more charges for killings in both Philadelphia and Delaware, including that of 28-year-old Metro by T-Mobile employee Leslie Ruiz-Basilio.

Below is a timeline of key events surrounding Gibson, dating back to his manslaughter conviction.

2010:

Gibson was convicted of manslaughter and possession of a firearm during the commission of a felony, Delaware Department of Corrections spokesman Jason Miller said.

June 2020:

Gibson was released from prison and sent to Level IV Community Corrections custody. Miller said Gibson violated probation by fighting with other offenders and was sentenced to six more months in prison, followed by 18 months of probation.

December 2020:

Gibson was once again released from prison and began his probation term.

January 2021:

Two men were shot dead in a store in Philadelphia’s Germantown neighborhood, but police did not recover a gun. Vanore said there still remain questions to be answered in the slayings, but it’s “certainly on our list of cases that we’re looking at” with regard to Gibson’s possible involvement.

February 2021:

Gibson’s mother was shot dead in her place of work in Philadelphia.

Family and friends told police Gibson had been released from jail and raised concerns about his behavior, Vanore said. Police found Gibson had violated probation, but they did not recover a gun, and video didn’t show him at the location of his mom’s murder, meaning any evidence linking Gibson was only “circumstantial,” Vanore said.

In a Delaware Department of Corrections report, Gibson’s probation officer wrote that Philadelphia police had contacted him to tell him Gibson was in their custody and being eyed as a suspect in his mother’s death. The officer requested that Gibson’s probation be revoked and that he be given a maximum sentence.

March 2021:

Gibson was extradited from Philadelphia to Delaware toward the end of the month, according to Miller.

April 2021:

On April 13, a probation violation hearing was held where the judge found Gibson guilty. Sentencing was delayed by two weeks to provide the defense time.

On April 27, at the sentencing hearing, Gibson’s public defender presented new evidence that the 39-year-old had community supports lined up as well as job prospects. Parole officials did not object to a recommendation by the public defender to sentence Gibson to time served plus 18 months probation. The judge accepted the recommendation.

May 2021:

On May 15, Leslie Ruiz-Basilio, a mother of two, was shot to death by a masked man while working at an Elsmere, Delaware, Metro by T-Mobile store. The man fled in Ruiz-Basilio’s vehicle. Elsmere police later contacted Philadelphia police, saying the man they were looking for fit the description of a man Philly officers were after in a Fairhill Dunkin’ store murder.

June 2021:

On June 5, a masked man carrying a revolver forced Christine Lugo, also a mother, into a Dunkin’ store in Philadelphia’s Fairhill neighborhood.

Surveillance video captured the suspect forcing Lugo to give him money – which Vanore said amounted to around $300 – before shooting and fleeing. Philadelphia police were then contacted by Elsmere police, and both agencies began working “very closely” together, Vanore said.

Around 2:24 a.m. on June 6, 42-year-old Ronald Wright as shot and killed in a street robbery in Wilmington, Delaware.

On Tuesday, June 7, Gibson was arrested on suspicion of pistol-whipping a Rite Aid clerk during another Wilmington robbery. Police tracked him down by using a GPS tracker that was in some of the money handed over to him.

They found him in possession of a revolver. The same type of weapon was used in the Philadelphia killing of Lugo at the Dunkin’ store.

On Wednesday, June 9, Krasner approved murder charges against Gibson in Lugo’s slaying. Officials have said they expect more charges, both in Philadelphia and Delaware.

NBC10’s Tim Furlong and Hannah Gross contributed to this story.

1 Dead as Car Flips in Roosevelt Expressway Crash

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At least one person died when two cars collided on the Roosevelt Expressway in Philadelphia Saturday morning.

The crash happened when a 51-year-old man was driving northbound on Roosevelt Boulevard and crashed into another car near the Fox Street exit, police said.

The 51-year-old’s car flipped and landed on its roof. He was taken to Einstein Medical Center, where he died at 2:35 a.m., police said.

The driver of the other vehicle was uninjured.

Philly Judge Tosses GOP Suit Seeking End to Delaware River Drilling Ban

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A federal judge on Friday threw out a lawsuit by Republican state lawmakers in Pennsylvania that sought to overturn a ban on gas drilling and hydraulic fracturing in the Delaware River basin, ruling they lacked standing to sue.

Senate Republicans led by Sens. Gene Yaw and Lisa Baker claimed the Delaware River Basin Commission overstepped its authority and usurped the Legislature with its moratorium on natural gas development near the river and its tributaries.

Judge Paul Diamond in Philadelphia ruled the GOP had no legal right to sue, writing the dispute “is primarily partisan and is best resolved through the political process.”

Diamond said the suit’s four municipal plaintiffs — Carbon and Wayne counties and Damascus and Dyberry Townships — also lacked standing, but gave them permission to refile the suit by July 1 to give them a chance to “articulate how the moratorium has actually injured them.”

A lawyer for the plaintiffs, Matt Haverstick, said the ruling was under review.

“For now, I can just say that we’re disappointed,” he said.

The moratorium had been in place since 2010. In February, one month after the Republicans filed suit, the basin commission voted to permanently ban natural gas drilling and fracking near the Delaware, asserting that gas development poses an unacceptable risk.

The ban applies to the entire watershed but, practically speaking, impacts Wayne and Pike counties in Pennsylvania’s northeastern tip. Both are part of the nation’s largest gas field, the Marcellus Shale. Nearly 13,000 wells have been drilled elsewhere in the vast Marcellus formation, turning Pennsylvania into the nation’s No. 2 gas-producing state.

A Pennsylvania landowners group is also challenging the basin commission’s right to regulate gas development. Baker and Yaw sought to intervene in that 2016 case — which is still being litigated — but a court ruled they lacked standing.

The commission oversees the water supply of more than 13 million people in four Northeastern states.

Gasoline Spills Into Waterways in Delco Town, Damages Marine Life

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A gasoline spill into a Delaware County creek damaged marine life and ground soil, officials said.

The spill seemed to be caused by overfilling after a gasoline shipment at the Gas N Go on the corner of Coebourn Boulevard and Edgmont Avenue in Brookhaven, Delaware County Emergency Services Director Tim Boyce said.

The gasoline spilled into the tributary of Chester Creek and a nearby retention pond of a local school, with various people reporting a strong gasoline smell around 7 a.m. Saturday.

Boyce said the smell would linger in the air “for some time” and that the Environmental Protection Agency will need to perform remediation of ground soil to remove the contaminated dirt.

Delaware County will temporarily shut off any water intake structures as a precaution, but drinking water should not be affected, Boyce said. The area has also been tested for any explosive levels of gasoline, but officials have not found any, he added.

Investigators will focus on whether the gas station had precautions in place that would have prevented overfilling.

Woman Admits Smuggling 15 Pounds of Cocaine Disguised in Wrapped Candy

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A Peruvian woman admitted Thursday to smuggling a large amount of cocaine from Peru to Newark concealed within wrapped chocolate candy inside her luggage.

Yolanda Fonseca-Melgarejo, 59, who is a legal permanent resident of the United States and a citizen of Peru, pleaded guilty to one count of importation of controlled substances before Newark Federal Court Thursday.

According to the Department of Justice, Fonseca-Melgarejo arrived at Newark International Airport in a flight from Peru on March 31, 2019. Upon arrival, officers discovered approximately seven kilograms of cocaine concealed within wrapped chocolate candy in her luggage.

Fonseca-Melgarejo now faces a minimum of 10 years in prison to of life and a fine of up to $10 million dollars for her crime, said the Department of Justice.

Her sentencing is scheduled for Oct. 14, 2021.

Allentown Woman Accused of Trying to Hire Hitman to Kill Husband

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An Allentown woman is under arrest after being accused of attempting to hire a hitman to kill her husband.

Claudia Carrion, 44, was charged with criminal solicitation to commit homicide after she agreed to pay $4,000 to a police detective posing as a hitman, the Lehigh County District Attorney’s Office said.

Carrion told the detective she wanted her husband killed because he was abusive, the DA’s office said. She paid the detective $100 upfront and said she’d pay the rest in installments, prosecutors said.

Carrion is being held on $500,000 bail and has retained a public defender. NBC10 called the Lehigh County Public Defender’s Office for comment, but the office was closed.

If you or someone you know is a victim of domestic violence, you can contact the National Domestic Violence Hotline online and by calling 1-800-799-SAFE (7233). You can also text with someone from the hotline be texting “START” to 1-800-799-SAFE (7233).

NJ School Mask Mandate Frustrations Spill Out During Hearing

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Frustrated parents on Friday called on New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy to relax mandates for mask wearing in schools across the state.

The testimony came during an Assembly Republican hearing on masks in schools and featured testimony from mothers and at least one school nurse. They raised concerns that the masks take a social and psychological toll on pupils and could make it particularly hard for younger children to learn since they can’t read teachers’ lips and their peers’ facial expressions.

The most emotional part of the hearing came when Brienne Zilinski played an audio recording of her young daughter, who had come home distraught and over not being able to understand her friends through their masks. Through crying, she also tells her mother she has migraines from wearing a mask.

Others questioned what the scientific basis for wearing masks was and others asked whether, particularly younger pupils, can correctly wear a mask all day at school.

The hearing lacked testimony from health officials and others who advise and support mask wearing at schools. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends the “consistent and correct” use of a mask for students and staff at schools to prevent the spread of the coronavirus.

Assembly Republican Leader Jon Bramnick said he was willing to hold a hearing next week for people supportive of masks. He pointed out none of those people signed up to speak Friday.

He said he thought the people at Friday’s hearing deserved to have their questions answered by the state’s top health official and Murphy.

“All I’m saying to you is let them speak and let them have a response from the commissioner or the governor,” he said in a phone interview after the hearing.

The issue has emerged as political, though it’s not clear it breaks down neatly on party lines.

Republicans held Friday’s hearing without the attendance of the Democratic majority, and the GOP has been skeptical of some COVID-19 countermeasures — like the closure of businesses and in some cases mask wearing. But one woman said Friday she was a registered Democrat and opposed the mandate and Murphy.

And last week in Trenton as lawmakers debated a bill to end the public health emergency stemming from COVID-19, dozens of parents rallied at the statehouse, calling for officials to “unmask” children. Many also carried signs of Republican candidates who were seeking the GOP nomination for governor, which took place Tuesday.

Murphy, a Democrat, said this week that school districts can use their judgment to relax mask mandates, particularly in cases of extreme heat.

Alyana Alfaro Post, the governor’s spokesperson, said in an email Friday that the mask-mandate order the governor signed aligns with CDC recommendations.

“The Order includes a number of exceptions to the indoor mask requirement, including in situations where wearing a mask would inhibit the individual child’s health,” she said.

There’s been no decision yet from Murphy’s administration on whether masks will be required in schools in the fall.





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