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Local News and Breaking News
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    Night owls are going to see some big schedule changes to their rides home on PATCO as the transit agency works to keep everyone safe.

    Last week, Delaware River Port Authority revealed its new late-night service plan, months after backlash from community members caused a delay in implementing the new Owl Service.

    The takeaways of the new Owl schedule that goes into effect on Saturday, Dec. 7 are as follows:

    • Owl trains run from midnight to 4 a.m. on weekdays and midnight to 5 a.m. on weekends
    • Trains will run every 60 minutes, rather than every 45 minutes.
    • All stations remain open 24/7, except for the 9th/10th and Locust Station in Center City Philadelphia, which already closes from 12:07 a.m. to 4:15 a.m. daily.
    • Only one four-car train will be looping through the system during overnight hours. The doors will only open on the middle two cars to encourage riders to sit closer to one another.
      “Owl riders are encouraged to board the train, even if it’s traveling in the opposite direction, rather than waiting in a station for the same train to return,” PATCO said in a news release.
    • A police officer will ride on board the trains from midnight to 4 a.m. on weekdays and from 2 a.m. to 5 a.m. on weekends.

    Back in May, PATCO officials said that a sex assault on an empty train in part prompted the changes. Earlier this year the woman passed out on an otherwise empty PATCO train early in the morning was sexually assaulted. A South Jersey man was charged in that incident.

    “Safety and security are still our top priority at PATCO and our new owl service plan incorporates the feedback and concerns of our riders," PATCO General Manager John Rink said.

    They came to the plan, which also includes the launch of the new PATCO 'Look Up. Speak Up' safety app and a safety awareness plan, based on the suggestions of a special task force formed in the wake of backlash from the previous plan.

    "It’s important to PATCO to listen to the communities we serve, and then act on what we have learned," Rink said.

    Back in May, PATCO also said that overnight ridership is very low, with only a handful of riders at each station. But, they insist the new Owl plan is all about making travel safer.

    "Our No. 1 goal is to ensure the safety of our riders and employees," DRPA/PATCO Police Chief John Stief said. "The owl task force provided solutions for increased police coverage and aligning riders in greater numbers together on trains and stations."

    PATCO's current Owl service remains in effect, for now.



    Photo Credit: NBC10

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    Thousands of runners will race through the city this weekend for the annual Philadelphia Marathon. That means traffic in the area will come to a screeching halt starting Friday. Take a look at all the road closures for the Philly Marathon Weekend:

    PHILLY MARATHON CLOSURES ON FRIDAY, NOV. 22

    The inner-drive lanes will be closed in both directions on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway from 9:30 a.m. until 2:45 p.m. on Friday. All lanes will be open for the afternoon rush hour. Inbound, inner lanes from Binswanger Triangle to 22nd Street will remain closed.

    PHILLY MARATHON CLOSURES ON SATURDAY, NOV. 23

    Street closures will be in effect for the Philadelphia Half Marathon, Rothman Institute 8K and Dunkin’ Munchkin Run starting on Saturday at 2 a.m. at the following locations:

    • Benjamin Franklin Parkway, from 16th Street to 22nd Street
    • Benjamin Franklin Parkway between 20th and 25th Streets
    • Martin Luther King Jr. Drive
    • Kelly Drive
    • 17th Street, from Arch Street to Vine Street
    • 18th Street, from Arch Street to Callowhill Street
    • 19th Street, from Arch Street to Callowhill Street
    • 20th Street, from Arch Street to Callowhill Street
    • 21st Street, from Arch Street to Spring Garden Street
    • 22nd Street, from Arch Street to Spring Garden Street
    • Market Street, from 6th Street to 16th Street
    • Chestnut Street, from 5th Street to 8th Street
    • 6th Street, from Market Street to Chestnut Street
    • 5th Street, from Chestnut Street to Race Street
    • South Penn Square
    • Juniper Street, from Chestnut Street to Market Street
    • John F. Kennedy Boulevard, from Juniper Street to 17th Street
    • 15th Street, from Race Street to Chestnut Street
    • 16th Street, from Chestnut Street to Race Street
    • Race Street, from 6th Street to Columbus Boulevard
    • Columbus Boulevard (southbound lanes), from Vine Street to Washington Avenue
    • Southbound off-ramp, from I-95 at Washington Avenue
    • Washington Avenue, from Columbus Boulevard to Front Street
    • Front Street, from Washington Avenue to South Street
    • South Street, from Front Street to 7th Street
    • 6th Street, from Bainbridge Street to Locust Street
    • Lombard Street, from 5th Street to Broad Street
    • 13th Street, from Bainbridge Street to Chestnut Street
    • Walnut Street, from 12th Street to 34th Street
    • 33rd Street, from Walnut Street to Spring Garden Street
    • 34th Street, from Spring Garden Street to Girard Avenue
    • Spring Garden Street, from 32nd Street to 34th Street
    • Girard Avenue, 33rd Street to 38th Street
    • 33rd Street, from Girard Avenue to Cecil B. Moore Avenue
    • Reservoir Drive from 33rd to Diamond
    • Mt. Pleasant Drive
    • Fountain Green Drive

    Motorists and pedestrians can expect significant delays when trying to cross roads or streets adjacent to the course. Police will allow traffic through intersections along the course, when possible, depending on the flow of the race participants.

    All of the streets, except for Eakins Oval will reopen by 2 p.m. Eakins Oval will be opened by 5 p.m. The inner drive of the Benjamin Franklin Parkway from Binswanger Triangle to 22nd Street will be closed until Sunday at 5 p.m.

    “No Parking” regulations will be enforced as part of enhanced security for the Half Marathon. All vehicles on the race route will be relocated starting at 2 a.m. Owners of towed vehicles should contact the Philadelphia Parking Authority.

    PHILLY MARATHON CLOSURES ON SUNDAY, NOV. 24

    The following streets will be closed starting at 2 a.m. on Sunday:

    • 17th Street, from Arch Street to Vine Street
    • 18th Street, from Arch Street to Callowhill Street
    • 19th Street, from Arch Street to Callowhill Street
    • 20th Street, from Arch Street to Callowhill Street
    • 21st Street, from Arch Street to Spring Garden Street
    • 22nd Street, from Arch Street to Spring Garden Street
    • Benjamin Franklin Parkway, from 16th Street to 22nd Street
    • Arch Street, between 3rd Street and 16th Street
    • 4th Street, between Arch Street and Vine Streets
    • Race Street, from 6th Street to Columbus Boulevard
    • Columbus Boulevard (southbound lanes), from Vine Street to Washington Avenue
    • Southbound off-ramp, from I-95 at Washington Avenue
    • Washington Avenue, from Columbus Boulevard to Front Street
    • Front Street, from Washington Avenue to South Street
    • South Street, from Front Street to 7th Street
    • 6th Street, from Bainbridge Street to Market Street
    • Chestnut Street, from 6th Street to 23rd Street
    • 22nd Street, from Locust Street to Market Street
    • Walnut Street, from 21st Street to 34th Street
    • 33rd Street, from Walnut Street to Chestnut Street
    • Chestnut Street, from 33rd Street to 34th Street
    • 34th Street, from Chestnut Street to Girard Avenue
    • Lansdowne Drive, from Girard Avenue to South Concourse Drive
    • South Concourse Drive, from Lansdowne to West Memorial Hall Drive
    • East Memorial Hall Drive, from South Concourse to Avenue of the Republic
    • Avenue of the Republic, from East Memorial Hall Drive to Catholic Fountain
    • Belmont Avenue, Montgomery to Parkside Avenue
    • States Drive to Lansdowne Drive
    • Lansdowne Drive to Black Road
    • Black Road
    • Martin Luther King Jr. Drive
    • Kelly Drive
    • The Falls Bridge
    • Ridge Avenue, from Schoolhouse Lane to Manayunk Avenue
    • Main Street, from Ridge Avenue to Conarroe Street

    All of the streets will reopen by 5 p.m. on Sunday

    SEPTA SERVICE

    Several SEPTA bus routes will have detours over the weekend due to the marathon. CLICK HERE for a full list.

    REGIONAL RAIL

    SEPTA’s Regional Rail will have the following service adjustments for the marathon on Saturday, Nov. 23 and Sunday, Nov. 24:

    • Media/Elwyn Line: Saturday and Sunday schedule adjustment for INBOUND (toward Center City) trains only.
    • West Trenton Line: Saturday and Sunday schedule adjustment for OUTBOUND (toward West Trenton) trains only.


    Photo Credit: Joseph Kaczmarek

    Runners participate in the Philadelphia Marathon, Sunday Nov. 18, 2018. NBC10 Photo/Joseph KaczmarekRunners participate in the Philadelphia Marathon, Sunday Nov. 18, 2018. NBC10 Photo/Joseph Kaczmarek

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    The 10-year-old shot during a high school football playoff Friday night in the Jersey Shore city of Pleasantville remains in a coma, authorities said Monday.

    Micah Tennant, who is from Atlantic City, is hospitalized at Cooper University Hospital in Camden. He was struck in the neck when gunfire erupted in the stands of a football game between Pleasantville and Camden high schools.

    "He’s a young kid. He’s in bad shape and while I don’t want to say much more, he’s worthy of everybody’s respect he’s pulled through this," Pleasantville Police Chief Sean Riggin said. "To be such a tough little kid, to be able to hang in there through a very critical serious injury, he’s an impressive young guy. I really want to see him pull through this but he’s in bad shape."

    The two high school teams are scheduled to finish their game at Lincoln Financial Field in Philadelphia on Wednesday at 4 p.m. The game was in the third quarter when the shooting occurred. The teams will play the remaining minutes at the Linc with free passes being distributed to the players' parents and family members. The game will be closed to the general public.

    One of two other people struck by bullets, Ibn Abdullah, allegedly was the intended target, police have said. Abdullah, who also allegedly brought a gun to the game, has also been charged in the shooting. A 15-year-old was shot as well, but has been released from the hospital.

    Players and spectators ran for cover Friday night after a gunman opened fire on a crowded New Jersey high school football game.

    The suspected shooter, 31-year-old Alvin Wyatt of Atlantic City, has been charged with three counts of attempted murder and two weapons counts, according to Tyner.

    He was captured in the end zone moments after the shooting by a Pleasantville officer assigned to the game, Tyner said.

    Three other men - Michael Mack, 27, Tyrell Dorn, 28, Shahid Dixon, 27, all of Atlantic City, and Vance Golden, 26, of Pleasantville - are charged with unlawful possession of a weapon, Tyner said. Dixon is also accused of eluding capture.

    After the shooting, they were seen driving toward Atlantic City with their headlights off, officials said. They were chased by a police officer and one of the passengers threw a gun off a drawbridge, investigators said. That gun was later recovered.

    Authorities have said it did not appear that any of the men charged had any connection to the game.

    "Unlike some of the shootings that have occurred on school premises throughout the country, this incident had nothing to do with the students of Pleasantville High School or Camden High School," Atlantic County Prosecutor Damon Tyner said over the weekend. "The venue simply presented an opportunity for criminals to pursue their own form of petty vengeance against one another. As a result, an innocent child was caught and injured in their crossfire. Our community will not be held hostage by a few idiots intent on jeopardizing our safety and the safety of our children."

    Pleasantville High School is about 7 miles west of Atlantic City and recently won a division title for the first time in 43 years. On Friday, the stands were packed to see the top-seeded Greyhounds take on the No. 4-seeded Panthers. 

    A reporter with The Press of Atlantic City, who was at the game, said the shooting occurred in the third quarter, during a punt with Camden leading 6-0.

    Videos obtained by The Associated Press and NBC10 showed people hitting the ground, running from the bleachers and jumping over chain-link fences as gunfire erupted. At least six gunshots were audible in a Jersey Sports Zone video, which also showed players stopping mid-play, looking at the stands and then turning to run.

    Panicked spectators and some players knocked down a fence in their haste to escape the field.



    Photo Credit: File photo
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    Micah Tennant, of Atlantic City, was shot while watching a high school football game in Pleasantville, New Jersey, Nov. 15, 2019.Micah Tennant, of Atlantic City, was shot while watching a high school football game in Pleasantville, New Jersey, Nov. 15, 2019.

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    Lanes dedicated to buses and right turns only could be coming to Roosevelt Boulevard as early as 2021, a transportation official said Monday.

    The City of Philadelphia's Office of Transportation, Infrastructure and Sustainability is currently studying the effects on traffic along the busy urban speedway, according to the city agency's policy director.

    "It would just get some of the traffic out of buses' way so they would be faster and more reliable," said Christopher Puchalsky of the Office of Transportation, Infrastructure and Sustainability.

    The initial bus-only lanes would be installed from the boulevard's intersection with Harbison Avenue in Northeast Philadelphia to the city's border with Bucks County. That is about an 8-mile stretch.

    Puchalsky said there is still at least a year of engineering work to do.

    More public presentations are also likely.

    The boulevard, which is also known as Route 1, is one of the most dangerous roads for pedestrians in both Philadelphia and all of Pennsylvania.

    WHYY first reported on Friday the proposed bus-only lanes as part of a larger initiative to improve the boulevard.


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    In preparation for the worst, University of Delaware Nursing students participated in a true-to-life disaster simulation. The exercise helps to teach the future medical professionals how to do their job while remaining calm in the chaos. NBC10s Delaware Reporter Tim Furlong warns, you may find some of the footage disturbing.


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    Within the Unites States, prostate cancer is one of the deadliest diseases for men. Dr. Dario Altieri, the President and CEO of the Wistar Institute, has devoted his career to changing that fact. NBC10's Brandon Hudson has the specifics on their newest success.



    Photo Credit: NBC10

    Dr. Dario Altieri Prostate Cancer ResearchDr. Dario Altieri Prostate Cancer Research

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    A woman is accused of murdering her quadriplegic daughter inside a Philadelphia home last year.

    Yelena Nezhikhovskaya, 63, was arrested Saturday and charged with murder and other related offenses in connection to the death of her daughter, 32-year-old Yulia Nezhikhovskaya.

    On Dec. 17, 2018, police responded to a home on the 9600 block of Bustleton Avenue. When they arrived they found the body of Yulia Nezhikhovskaya who was pronounced dead at the scene. Investigators said the victim was quadriplegic.

    Police have not yet revealed a possible motive or the exact cause of death.



    Photo Credit: Philadelphia Police

    Yelena Nezhikhovskaya. See larger image here. Yelena Nezhikhovskaya. See larger image here.

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    A burglar’s balancing act is caught on camera. The unidentified suspect shattered glass to break into Mel’s Diner in Philly’s Roxborough neighborhood. NBC10’s Aaron Baskerville spoke to the owner about the damage left behind.


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    Brittney Shipp has Sabrina's Cafe on her radar. The NBC10 meteorologist taste tests the popular restaurant's super-sized stuffed French toast and gets an inside-look at the delicious recipe.



    Photo Credit: NBC10

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    New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy and officials from the Department of Environmental Protection announced Monday that the state will allocate $13 million in funding to local communities and a new initiative to reduce and prevent future harmful algal blooms.

    The new initiative is intended to address the increased occurrence of harmful algal blooms statewide through an enhanced program of science-based prevention, mitigation, study, and response, according to Gov. Phil Murphy's office. 

    The initiative will leverage both state and federal funds to offer principal forgiveness to offset infrastructure upgrades necessary to reduce the discharge of nutrient-laden runoff into waterbodies, which happens to be one of the primary causes of harmful algal blooms.

    "The presence of harmful algal blooms in New Jersey’s waterbodies severely impacts our public health and economy,” Murphy said in a statement. “The rise of harmful algal blooms is a global challenge and our initiative to reduce future blooms will allow us to protect the health of our residents, as well as the economies of our lake communities."

    The motion comes during a year in which New Jersey experienced a high number of harmful algal blooms. In 2019, there were over 70 suspected and 39 confirmed harmful algal blooms in New Jersey, which is higher than the previous two years.

    Over the summer toxic algal blooms sprung up in a number of bodies of water in New Jersey, including Greenwood Lake and Lake Hopatcong -- the state's largest lake -- forcing the state to issue directives asking the public to avoid contact with the water.

    Officials say the bacteria can cause a skin rash, abdominal pain, headaches or vomiting. Several people were said to have gotten mild rashes from dips in Lake Hopatcong before the order was issued.


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    There may be no such thing as a free lunch, but apparently there is such a thing as a free house.

    A house in Montclair, New Jersey, is being given away for free by the church next door that owns it, as they seek to expand with a new structure.

    The six-bedroom home on North Willow Street may come at no cost, but there is a pretty big catch: Anyone who wants the house can’t keep it in its current location. The new structure planned for the Redeemer Montclair Church’s community activity will sit on the property the house currently occupies.

    Moving the 3,000-square-foot house will come at a pretty hefty cost: Likely more than $100,000, in addition to having to possibly buy a plot of land to move it to, according to the contractor on site.

    “I think it’s great if it can be done,” said project manager Tom Lapenter. “It just comes down to money … If it’s local, it may be feasible. If it’s far, I don’t see it happening.”

    The house was built in 1910 and is in great condition, workers said. However there is another problem: Being three-stories high, it doesn’t clear the power lines right outside, adding another wrinkle into the plan.

    “You would either have to lift them or disconnect them,” said Lapenter. “So you’d have to have the phone company, electric company, everybody on site as it goes.”

    The church said if they can’t find anyone willing to buy and move the house, they’ll have to demolish it. The Montclair Historic Preservation Committee asked the Church to at least try to find someone to take the house to save the structure.

    There have been no serious offers yet, according to the church.

    The house will be available for another month before they ultimately have to tear it down, unless someone comes forward before then to move it.



    Photo Credit: NBC New York

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    Former NFL QB Don McPherson is the author of “You Throw Like a Girl,” a book that explores machismo and its effects on society in the #MeToo era.


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    Nearly 80 children from a North Philadelphia school were displaced this week after asbestos was detected in the building's boiler room, according to a letter shared with parents.

    The discovery was made while school district officials inspected Pratt Head Start on North 22nd Street as a temporary space for students whose school was over capacity or unexpectedly closed.

    The school district’s Office of Early Childhood Education announced the building closure on Tuesday and is relocating students and staff.

    Families will be made aware of their children’s new school placements by Thursday, the district said. The goal is to find Pre-Ks that are convenient for the affected families.

    The district hopes to remediate the asbestos by the end of the school year.

    This latest asbestos discovery follows closures at Benjamin Franklin High School and Science Leadership Academy, which share a building on North Broad Street and where asbestos was detected in September during building renovations. The district relocated 1,000 students to other locations as remediation took place.

    Alongside the closure of Pratt Head Start, district officials announced they are using at least $12 million in operating funds and $500 million in capital funding to alleviate issues like asbestos and lead paint in 141 of its aging buildings. About 86,000 young people will be affected by "Healthy Schools" environmental plan, the district said.

    Asbestos is a fibrous material that was commonly used in commercial products such as installation and fire proofing for decades, according to The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).

    When inhaled, the microscopic particles from asbestos can cause life-threatening diseases including lung cancer and mesothelioma, the NIOSH says.

    “Asbestos is in a lot of our schools and it doesn’t pose a problem unless it’s damaged,” Superintendent William Hite said at a news conference Tuesday.

    The district stopped using asbestos in any buildings erected after 1978, Hite said.

    Asbestos and lead paint removal could wind up increasing the cost of improving the buildings, Hite said.

    The impact of the improvement could differ from building to building. Hite said he wants the district to be proactive in communicating concerns found in buildings.

    The new initiative also calls for a "see something, say something" policy where students and staffs are encouraged to report any concerns and the district's Office of Environmental Management Services will follow up within 24 hours. 

    "We are here to educate, but students cannot learn at their highest levels and educators cannot do their best work if they are concerned about the environmental safety of their schools," Hite said.



    Photo Credit: NBC10
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    Nursing students in the University of Delaware underwent a peculiar emergency training where theater student’s role played being victims of an SUV crash. With blood and screams of pain, it is all part of an immersive simulation for students to practice and evaluate how they would behave in an emergency situation.


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    An opinion piece written by Philadelphia Eagles star safety Malcolm Jenkins and published by the Inquirer that recommends reforms for the city police department was labeled "racist" by the city police union's president.

    Jenkins, whose essay ran Monday on Inquirer.com, calls for six reforms under the next police commissioner, including "how law enforcement polices our children" and increases in "accountability" and "transparency."

    He also asked that Mayor Kenney listens to Philadelphia residents as he looks for a permanent replacement to former Commissioner Richard Ross, who resigned in August. Ross is accused of mishandling sexual harassment claims by two female officers, according to a lawsuit.

    On Tuesday, the president of Philadelphia Fraternal Order of Police #5, which represents uniformed officers, wrote a letter to the newspaper, according to his Twitter account.

    "Hurling slurs and false allegations against police offers nothing in the way of improvement, " FOP President John McNesby wrote. "Like other has been football players, they now do most of their running with their mouths."

    McNesby used a couple other football-related zingers in his six-paragraph letter, including: "Only the Inquirer would offer Malcolm Jenkins to tackle crime, when he can't even manage to tackle his own opponents."

    (Last year, Jenkins was voted by fellow NFL players as the 96th best player in the entire league.)

    McNesby also called Jenkins' calls for reforms "a racist attack" and claims Jenkins doesn't live in Philadelphia.

    Property and voter registration records, however, indicate that Jenkins does live in the Northern Liberties neighborhood. He is registered as a Democrat in Pennsylvania's 175th legislative district, according to state records.

    Jenkins has been one of the most outspoken professional athletes for reform the criminal justice system, from overhauling the bail and parole systems to decriminalization of misdemeanor drug offenses and changes in police-community relations.

    NBC10 spoke with him last year as he went cross-country campaigning for progressive district attorneys running in local elections.

    He and billionaire George Soros have both been very active in supporting local prosecutors like Larry Krasner, who they see as positive agents of change in criminal justice. Soros earlier in November scored another victory locally when he lent support to Democrat Jack Stollsteimer in the Delaware County District Attorney's race. Stollsteimer went on to beat incumbent Republican Kat Copeland.

    "Everyone in this reform battle is realizing this is a place where we can quickly see change," Jenkins said in an interview in May 2018. "In California, DAs are being elected in Oakland, San Diego and Sacramento. This is an opportunity to start here and push that reform across the country. We’ve seen the fruits of that in Philadelphia."

    Jenkins helped form The Players Coalition to push — and fund — social justice reform. One of their main efforts has been combating police brutality against minorities.

    Among his six proposed reforms, Jenkins called for Mayor Jim Kenney to hire a police commissioner that won't bow to McNesby's powerful union.

    "Nearly every time we hear a story of an officer abusing power, whether through violence or racist Facebook postings, the police union is there to defend the bad behavior," Jenkins wrote in the op-ed. "We need a commissioner who isn’t in lockstep with the union and who will instead push back when the union tries to hide and justify bad behavior."

    At the end of the essay, Jenkins wrote that "a commissioner who commits to meeting these demands will have taken a critical step forward in repairing a system that is deeply broken."



    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    John McNesby, president of the Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 5, left; Malcolm Jenkins #27 of the Philadelphia Eagles, right.John McNesby, president of the Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 5, left; Malcolm Jenkins #27 of the Philadelphia Eagles, right.

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    UNO unveiled a new version of the classic card game that aims to keep political discussions out of family card games. 



    Photo Credit: Getty Images/iStockphoto

    Multiracial friends having fun and playing game of cards UNO against christmas treeMultiracial friends having fun and playing game of cards UNO against christmas tree

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    The man accused of shooting into a crowded football game in South Jersey Friday night video chatted with an accomplice, who gave him the location of their intended target moments before shots rang out, according to court records. 

    Shahid Dixon, 27, told police that he spoke with accused gunman Alvin Wyatt, 31, via FaceTime and instructed him on where to find 27-year-old Ibn Abdullah.

    Wyatt then shot in that direction, hitting Abdullah and two children, according to police. One of the young victims, a 10-year-old boy, remains in a coma, officials said Monday.

    The bloody scene unfolded Friday night at Pleasantville High School, about 7 miles west of Atlantic City. The football team had recently won a division title for the first time in 43 years and were playing the Camden Panthers.

    Videos obtained by The Associated Press and NBC10 showed people hitting the ground, running from the bleachers and jumping over chain-link fences as gunfire erupted.

    At least six gunshots were audible in a Jersey Sports Zone video, which also showed players stopping mid-play, looking at the stands and then turning to run.

    Panicked spectators and some players knocked down a fence in their haste to escape the field.

    "My first reaction was run, run, because you don't wan to be caught up in it," Ernest Howard Jr., co-captain of the Pleasantville High School football team, told NBC10. "The next thing you hear are the gunshots and everybody starts running for the far fence and break through the fence."

    Howard's mother, Keisha Miles, was in the stands during the shooting.

    "My heart dropped," Miles said. "I tried to keep faith and I was very, very worried."

    Abdullah, who allegedly brought a gun to the game, has also been charged in the shooting. A 15-year-old was shot, as well, but has been released from the hospital. 

    Suspected shooter Wyatt, of Atlantic City, has been charged with three counts of attempted murder and two weapons counts, according to Atlantic County Prosecutor Damon Tyner.

    He was captured in the end zone moments after the shooting by a Pleasantville officer assigned to the game, Tyner said.

    Three other men - Dixon, 27-year-old Michael Mack, 28-year-old Tyrell Dorn, all of Atlantic City, and Vance Golden, 26, of Pleasantville - are charged with unlawful possession of a weapon, police said. Dixon is also accused of eluding capture.

    Authorities have said it did not appear that any of the men charged had any connection to the football game.



    Photo Credit: NBC10 SkyForce10
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    Two people were shot at a high school football game in Pleasantville, New Jersey, on Friday night, Nov. 15, 2019.Two people were shot at a high school football game in Pleasantville, New Jersey, on Friday night, Nov. 15, 2019.

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    The head of the Philadelphia police officers' union disparaged Eagles star safety Malcolm Jenkins Tuesday, calling an opinion essay by the football player in the Philadelphia Inquirer a"racist attack."


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    Stuffed Puffs along with popular electronic music producer DJ Marshmello are helping to bring jobs to the Lehigh Valley with a new manufacturing center. NBC10's Steven Fisher has the details.


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    New technology is providing local doctors a valuable tool in treating lung cancer. NBC10's Steven Fisher explains.


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    Here are some tips for keeping your packages out of the wrong hands during the holiday shopping season.


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    It was the middle of the night, and 11-year-old Jake Orlick woke up with pain shooting through his right leg.

    “It almost felt like a sharp, shooting pain, like somebody punched you,” he said.

    Months earlier, Jake had complained to his moms about leg pain that seemed to come and go. The family pediatrician said it was likely growing pains and Jake should take Advil. But there was something different about this night.

    “He woke us up in agony one night in March and we rushed over thinking it was a bone cyst,” his mother Carly Driban said.

    Urgent Care doctors took an x-ray and told them to go straight to the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Hours later, they were sitting in front of an oncologist. Jake had Ewing’s Sarcoma, a rare form of bone cancer.

    “I was really angry and upset and all I could think about was the future and how it was going to go,” Jake said.

    “Since March 17 he has not walked. It’s been tough on him, tough on us,” his mother Cinde Orlick-Driban added.

    Jake would need 14 rounds of chemotherapy over the next few months. He started almost immediately.

    Meanwhile, just across the street from where he gets treatment, researchers are working hard to unlock the mysteries of Ewing’s Sarcoma.

    “For pediatric cancer, there is a tremendous need,” Dr. Patrick Grohar said. “There is less national funding going toward pediatric cancer than the adult counterparts.”

    Grohar is the Director of Translational Research at CHOP. He and his team focus mainly on patients who have relapsed, and they might just be on the verge of a breakthrough.

    “It’s been known for about 25 years that this particular tumor is dependent on a specific protein target, but it’s considered to be undruggable. We have a clinical trial that’s set to open in the next couple of months that we believe will hit this target for the first time.”

    It could be a game-changer for patients.

    As for Jake, he has one more round of chemo before his next big challenge. His family is also trying to raise awareness and money as he fights the disease.

    “Knowing that your child’s leg is probably going to be amputated, what will come from that, all of that is a hard thing to swallow,” Orlick-Driban said.

    But Jake says he knows he will be OK. And he has a message to other kids just like him.

    “It might seem like a long journey," he said, "But never give up, and stay strong.”



    Photo Credit: NBC10

    Jake Orlick, 11, is being treated for Ewing’s Sarcoma, a rare form of bone cancer. Across the street from his treatment, CHOP doctors are working toward a cure.Jake Orlick, 11, is being treated for Ewing’s Sarcoma, a rare form of bone cancer. Across the street from his treatment, CHOP doctors are working toward a cure.

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    One person is dead while at least five others are hurt following four separate shootings that all occurred within a 20-minute span in Philadelphia, Tuesday night. 

    The first shooting occurred around 7:55 p.m. Three men, all 24 years of age, were on the 4400 block of North 17th Street when an unidentified gunman opened fire.

    One man was shot once in the chest. He was taken to Temple University Hospital where he was pronounced dead at 8:09 p.m. The second man was shot in the left arm while the third man was shot in the right hip. Both survivors were taken to the hospital and are currently in stable condition.

    Police told NBC10 they found over 22 shell casings at the scene and two gunmen may have been involved. A weapon has not been recovered however.

    A second shooting occurred around 8 p.m. on the 5500 block of Regent Street in West Philadelphia. A 30-year-old man was shot once in the chest by an unidentified gunman. The victim was taken to the Penn Presbyterian Medical Center where he is currently in stable condition.

    The third shooting occurred at 8:04 p.m. on the 6100 block of Castor Avenue. A 20-year-old man was shot once in the head by an unidentified gunman. He was taken to the hospital in stable condition.

    Finally, a fourth shooting occurred on the 7100 block of Crittenden Street in Philadelphia’s Mount Airy neighborhood. A 20-year-old man was sitting in the passenger side of a vehicle at the location when a gunman opened fire. The man was shot four times in the chest and taken to the Einstein Medical Center in critical condition.

    No arrests have been made in any of the shootings and police have not yet revealed whether any of them are related.

    The location for the triple shooting is located about nine miles away from the Regent Street shooting, five miles away from the Castor Avenue shooting and about four and a half miles away from the Crittenden Street shooting.

    If you have information on any of the shootings, please call Philadelphia Police.

    This story is developing. Check back for updates.

    There are additional community resources for people or communities that have endured gun violence. Further information can be found here.


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    A stranger threw a board at a man's face during a random attack in Philadelphia’s Spring Garden section, police said.

    Jose Collazo, 44, was texting his co-worker and walking to his job on the 800 block of North Broad Street Friday around 8:30 a.m. Collazo told NBC10 another man nearby suddenly threw a board at him, striking him in the face and missing his eye by inches.

    “He stopped and launched it like he was playing Frisbee with a dog,” Collazo said.

    Collazo said he initially didn’t know what hit him but then realized he was gushing blood.

    “I’m like, ‘What could this man be thinking?’ But it hit me so hard, I started gushing blood out like crazy,” Collazo said.

    Collazo was taken to the hospital where he received 30 stitches.

    Police released surveillance video of the suspect tossing the board. He’s described as a man standing 5-foot-10 and wearing a black jacket, blue jeans, white socks and sandals.

    Collazo told NBC10 he forgives the man and is hoping he gets the help he needs.

    “May you get help,” Collazo said. “May the government help you. You could have mental issues, I don’t know. But God forbid it happens to somebody else.”

    If you have any information on the incident, please call 911 or 215-686-TIPS.



    Photo Credit: Philadelphia Police
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    Surveillance photo of the suspect tossing the board at the victim. See larger image here. Surveillance photo of the suspect tossing the board at the victim. See larger image here.

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    Several fire trucks were taken off the streets in Philadelphia during the recession, limiting coverage in Roxborough, Frankford, Old City and South Philadelphia. Now, for the first time in more than a decade, fire trucks are heading back to four fire companies in the city. NBC10’s Matt DeLucia has the details.


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    You’ve seen them on Facebook, on Twitter and on Instagram and you may have shared them too. But, what if the memes we share are a modern version of a propaganda poster?



    Photo Credit: NBC10

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    Expect to pay more for your Christmas tree this year as the biggest tree producing states are dealing with a shortage due to the weather. But, the issue is rooted in something that happened more than a decade ago.



    Photo Credit: Valery Matytsin/TASS

    Worker holds a Christmas treeWorker holds a Christmas tree

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    Despite the fact that Walnut Street restaurant Bareburger was jam-packed during dinner rush on "Hamilton" show nights, some customers did not want to "Wait For It."

    "Everyone who comes in here, because it's across the street, is like, 'Oh, I'm going to the theater so I need to get in and out of here in a hurry,' and we're like, 'So is everybody else,'" Manager John Dubitsky said.

    Bareburger, like several other restaurants near the Forrest Theatre, saw a bump in business and changed it up to accommodate the two-and-a-half month run of "Hamilton." The hit musical about the founding fathers (not including Benjamin Franklin) made its way to Philadelphia in August and let the final curtain fall on Sunday.

    Read more about 'Hamilton's' effect on restaurants near the Forrest Theatre on PBJ.com.

    Get all your business news with the Philadelphia Business Journal.



    Photo Credit: Charles Sykes/Invision/AP, File

    In this Aug. 6, 2015 file photo, Lin-Manuel Miranda appears at the curtain call following the opening night performance of In this Aug. 6, 2015 file photo, Lin-Manuel Miranda appears at the curtain call following the opening night performance of "Hamilton" at the Richard Rodgers Theatre in New York.

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    The city of Philadelphia are expecting to get more than 100 new firefighters and that means the fire department can begin reopening fire companies the South Philly, Center City, Frankford and Roxborough neighborhoods.



    Photo Credit: NBC10

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    Micah Tennant, the 10-year-old boy who was shot last week while attending a high school football playoff game in Pleasantville, New Jersey, has died, authorities said Wednesday.

    Tennant was struck in the neck by a bullet on Friday as he sat on bleachers watching a football game between Pleasantville and Camden high schools. He fell into a coma from his injuries while being treated at Cooper University Hospital in Camden.

    "Words at this time seem so insufficient to portray the anger and outrage that our community feels regarding his loss," Atlantic County Prosecutor Damon Tyner said in a news release Wednesday afternoon.

    Tennant was one of three people shot at the game. A man, who police believe is the intended target, and teenage boy were also injured.

    Pleasantville High School is about seven miles west of Atlantic City — where Tennant lived. On Friday, the stands were packed to see the top-seeded Greyhounds take on the No. 4-seeded Panthers.

    A reporter with The Press of Atlantic City, who was at the game, said the shooting occurred in the third quarter, during a punt with Camden leading 6-0.

    Videos obtained by The Associated Press and NBC10 showed people hitting the ground, running from the bleachers and jumping over chain-link fences as gunfire erupted. At least six gunshots were audible in a Jersey Sports Zone video, which also showed players stopping mid-play, looking at the stands and then turning to run.

    Panicked spectators and some players knocked down a fence in their haste to escape the field.

    One of two other people struck by bullets, 27-year-old Ibn Abdullah, allegedly was the intended target, police have said. Abdullah, who allegedly brought a gun to the game, has also been charged in the shooting. A 15-year-old was grazed by a bullet, but has been released from the hospital. 

    The suspected shooter, 31-year-old Alvin Wyatt of Atlantic City, has now been charged with murder along with attempted murder and weapons counts, according to Tyner

    He was captured in the end zone moments after the shooting by a Pleasantville officer assigned to the game, Tyner said.

    Tyner promised to prosecute Wyatt to the fullest extent of the law.

    Three other men — Michael Mack, 27, Tyrell Dorn, 28, Shahid Dixon, 27, all of Atlantic City, and Vance Golden, 26, of Pleasantville — are charged with unlawful possession of a weapon, police said. Dixon is also accused of eluding capture.

    After the shooting, they were seen driving toward Atlantic City with their headlights off, officials said. They were chased by a police officer and one of the passengers threw a gun off a drawbridge, investigators said. That gun was later recovered.

    Authorities have said it did not appear that any of the men charged had any connection to the game.

    "Unlike some of the shootings that have occurred on school premises throughout the country, this incident had nothing to do with the students of Pleasantville High School or Camden High School," Tyner said over the weekend. "The venue simply presented an opportunity for criminals to pursue their own form of petty vengeance against one another. As a result, an innocent child was caught and injured in their crossfire. Our community will not be held hostage by a few idiots intent on jeopardizing our safety and the safety of our children."

    Dixon told police just before the shooting he spoke to Wyatt on FaceTime about where to find Abdullah.

    The two high school teams finished their game at Lincoln Financial Field in Philadelphia on Wednesday. The teams played the remaining minutes at the Linc with free passes distributed to the players' parents and family members. The game was closed to the general public.

    Both teams were greeted by members of the Philadelphia Eagles prior to the game. Camden ultimately won 22-0.


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    Dashcam video from a West Windsor Police Department patrol car captured the moment an Amtrak train slammed into an alleged drunk driver's car stuck on the tracks Tuesday night. 

    The harrowing event began when police responded to a report of a disabled car on the west bound train tracks beneath the Route 64 Bridge at the Princeton Junction Station, just north of Washington Road shortly before midnight.

    The disabled 2012 Toyota Camry had been driven by 23-year-old Amna Ahmed, who was at the scene when police arrived, Lee said, adding that on an access road next to the train tracks was another vehicle, a white BMW, that was occupied by Ahmed’s father and sister, who arrived to help her.

    According to Lt. Mark Lee of the West Windsor Police Department, police dispatch began to make notifications to stop all train traffic due to the Camry being on a track and people in close proximity to the train tracks.

    While the car was still on the track a West Bound Amtrak Train #639 was seen approaching at a high rate of speed. Seeing the train making its way to where they were, two officers took Ahmed and found cover behind a building along the tracks, while her sister and father, who were still in the BMW, moved further away from the impact zone. 

    Another officer ran for cover behind the concrete bridge abutment as the train struck the Camry -- sending heavy debris flying toward the area of the officers, according to Lee. 

    The impact demolished the Camry, which was sent directly into one of the patrol cars resulting in "extensive damage." The other patrol car and the BMW sustained "moderate damage after being pelted by a shower of debris from the Toyota," police said.

    The train also sustained heavy damage to a number of its train cars.

    "It's an absolute miracle no one was hurt," Lee said. 

    Dashcam video of the incident shared by the West Windsor Police Department depicts the train impacting the car, sending it flying into the vehicle equipped with the dashcam. While no one was hurt in the incident, viewer discretion is advised. 

    The impact and subsequent aftermath disrupted train traffic for about three hours, police say. 

    Ahmed was ultimately charged with reckless driving and DWI. Attorney information was not immediately known. 

    Lee said that the harrowing event showcases the bravery and "the incredible job" by the three officers who responded to the scene and "were in harm's way."

    "We couldn't be any prouder of our officers," Lee added.

    In a statement to News 4, Amtrak said there were no reported injuries from passengers on board or the crew.

    "This is a critical reminder about the importance of exercising caution around railroad tracks and crossings. Amtrak continues to work closely with Operation Lifesaver (OLI) to communicate these dangers," Amtrak's statement reads in part.



    Photo Credit: Handout

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    In an effort to curb youth vaping, Philadelphia businesses could be required to get a special license to sell electronic cigarettes.

    The amendment to the city's business code would establish "electronic smoking device" licenses and restrict them to adults-only stores. Businesses without an "adults-only ESD establishment" license would be barred from selling e-cigarettes, and only those with such a license would be allowed to sell e-cigs with flavors other than tobacco.

    At a hearing to discuss the proposal Wednesday, Philadelphia Health Commissioner Dr. Thomas Farley emphasized the prevalence of flavored e-cigarettes, including those with the flavor of menthol, among youths who vape.

    "Restricting the sale of flavored products would be a major step forward in reducing the number of children who become addicted to nicotine," Farley said.

    The proposal would require businesses to prevent entry to anyone under 18 years old, as well as to hold a valid tobacco retailer permit, if they wish to get an ESD license and sell vaping products. The bill would limit the sale of e-cigarettes with more than 20 mg/ml of nicotine salts, and the city's Department of Public Health would renew business' ESD licenses on an annual basis.

    Violators would be fined $250, and every day that they're out of compliance would constitute a new offense.

    Council President Darrell Clarke, as well as council members Cindy Bass, William Greenlee and Curtis Jones sponsored the legislation.

    Opponents of the ordinance, like Jeff Allen, whose store sells tobacco products, say they don't want kids to vape but fear the financial repercussions of the change. "What I also see in Philadelphia is blocks and blocks of neighborhoods that have no stores left because they have no products to sell," Allen said.

    If the City Council passes the bill, it would take effect immediately. The earliest the Council will vote on it will be Dec. 5.

    The ordinance was first introduced last month, against a backdrop of multiple deaths and a federal warning about the dangers of electronic cigarettes.

    As of Nov. 13, 42 people in 24 states and Washington, D.C., had died due to vaping, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Those deaths include people in Pennsylvania, Delaware and New Jersey.

    The CDC also reported 2,016 vaping-related injuries as of Nov. 5.

    As the investigations into the deaths and illnesses continue, the CDC and Food and Drug Administration have recommended that people stop using electronic cigarette products altogether, especially those containing THC or bought off the street.



    Photo Credit: EVA HAMBACH/AFP/Getty Images

    This Oct. 2, 2018, illustration shows a man exhaling smoke from an electronic cigarette in Washington.This Oct. 2, 2018, illustration shows a man exhaling smoke from an electronic cigarette in Washington.

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    Philadelphia International Airport ranks among some of the most expensive big airports in the United States and the worst in terms of reliability, value and convenience, according to two new reports.

    PHL ranked No. 8 on a list of the most expensive airports in the country, placing it with John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York and San Francisco International Airport. The most expensive airport was Newark Liberty International Airport in New Jersey.

    The Points Guy, a travel blog, determined the rankings by taking into account the average price of domestic airfare, baggage-cart rental prices, parking fees, the cost of an Uber from the city center and what a customer can expect to pay for a small Starbucks coffee.

    To read more about how Philadelphia International Airport ranks among others in the U.S., go to PBJ.com.

    Get all your business news with the Philadelphia Business Journal.



    Photo Credit: Matt Slocum/AP

    A traveler makes his way through the Philadelphia International Airport, Friday, May 27, 2016, in Philadelphia. Memorial Day weekend is considered the unofficial start of summer vacations for many and a busy travel period.A traveler makes his way through the Philadelphia International Airport, Friday, May 27, 2016, in Philadelphia. Memorial Day weekend is considered the unofficial start of summer vacations for many and a busy travel period.

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    Getting an early start on Black Friday shopping has become a Thanksgiving tradition for some Philadelphia-area families and an opportunity for malls and stores to jump start the holiday shopping season.

    We’ve compiled a list of when malls in Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware open on Thanksgiving (some don’t) and Black Friday so you can plan out your shopping day.

    Happy deal hunting.

    Pennsylvania Shopping Centers

    Exton Square: Nov. 28 - Closed, Nov. 29 - 6 a.m. to 10 p.m.

    Fashion District: Nov. 28 - Noon to 6 p.m., Nov. 29 - 6 a.m. to 8 p.m.

    King of Prussia: Nov. 28 - 5 p.m. to 1 a.m., Nov. 29 - 6 a.m. to 10 p.m.

    Lehigh Valley Mall: Nov. 28 - 5 p.m. to 1 a.m., Nov. 29 - 6 a.m. to 10 p.m.

    Montgomery Mall: Nov. 28 - 5p.m. to 1 a.m., Nov. 29 - 6 a.m. to 10 p.m.

    Neshaminy Mall: Nov. 28 - 6 p.m. to midnight, Nov. 29 - 6 a.m. to 10 p.m.

    Oxford Valley Mall: Nov. 28 - 5 p.m. to 1 a.m., Nov. 29 - 6 a.m. to 10 p.m.

    Philadelphia Mills: Nov. 28 - 6 p.m. to midnight, Nov. 29 - 6 a.m. to 9 p.m.

    Philadelphia Premium Outlets: Opens at 6 p.m. on Nov. 28 and stays open until 10 p.m. on Nov. 29

    Plymouth Meeting Mall: Nov. 28 - Closed, Nov. 29 - 6 a.m. to 10 p.m.

    Shops at Liberty Place: Nov. 28 - Closed, Nov. 29 - 9:30 a.m. to 7 p.m

    Springfield Mall: Nov. 28 - Closed, Nov. 29 - 6 a.m. to 10 p.m.

    Willow Grove Park Mall: Nov. 28 from 6 p.m. to midnight, Nov. 29 - 6 a.m. to 10 p.m.

    New Jersey Malls

    Cherry Hill Mall: Nov. 28 - 6 p.m. to midnight, Nov. 29 - 6 a.m. to 10 p.m.

    Cumberland Mall: Nov. 28 - Closed, Nov. 29 - 6 a.m. to 10 p.m.

    Deptford Mall: Nov. 28 6 p.m. to midnight, Nov. 29 - 6 a.m. to 10 p.m.

    Gloucester Premium Outlets: Opens at 6 p.m. on Nov. 28 and stays open until 10 p.m. on Nov. 29

    Hamilton Mall: Nov. 28: Macy's - 5 p.m. to 2 a.m. and Shoppers World - 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Nov. 29: Mall - 6 a.m. to 9 p.m. and Macy's/Shoppers World - 6 a.m. to 10 p.m.

    Jackson Premium Outlets: Opens at 6 p.m. on Nov. 28 and stays open until 10 p.m. on Nov. 29

    Moorestown Mall: Nov. 28 - Closed, Nov. 29 - 6 a.m. to 10 p.m.

    Quaker Bridge Mall: Nov. 28 - 5 p.m. to 1 a.m., Nov. 29 - 6 a.m. to 10 p.m.

    Tanger Outlets Atlantic City: Nov. 28 - Closed, Nov. 29 - 6 a.m. to 9 p.m.

    Delaware Malls

    Christiana Mall: Nov. 28 - 6 p.m. to midnight, Nov. 29 6 a.m. to 10 p.m.

    Dover Mall: Nov. 28 - 5 p.m. to 1 a.m., Nov. 29 6 a.m. to 10 p.m.



    Photo Credit: AP

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    Duane Raible did not know it at the time, but in the early morning hours of Oct. 2, the Pennsylvania man was having a major stroke.

    "The whole room went bizarre. I almost passed out. I pushed myself back to the bed and lay down," Raible said.  "I realized right then and there: something’s really wrong."

    Raible, 52, who lives north of Allentown, Pennsylvania, was in Chicago on business last month and staying at the Thompson Chicago Hotel.

    That's when the real-life nightmare occurred. In 911 recordings, Raible can be heard pleading to Chicago dispatchers for help from his cell phone. During two calls, dispatchers repeatedly asked Raible for the address of the hotel at which he was staying. 

    Click here to listen to the entirety of Raible’s 911 calls in this extended report.

    Even after he repeatedly told the dispatcher on the first call that he didn't know the address and couldn't move, she told him to "help yourself" by getting her an address.

    TONIGHT ON NBC10 NEWS AT 11 P.M.: Duane Raible talks to NBC10 about the fateful night that nearly cost him his life.

    Raible somehow managed to get the address, and called 911 a second time. On that call, the dispatcher didn't hear him say the location. Finally, a police officer also on the call heard the address.

    "The incident is under review," a spokeswoman for the Chicago Office of Emergency Management and Communications said when asked if the dispatchers handled Raible's calls properly.

    According to Melissa Stratton, spokeswoman for Chicago’s OEMC, the office is pursuing new technology to assist in providing more accurate location information of callers, and expects to implement the technology in the near future.

    Six Million Brain Cells Killed

    During his first call to 911, Raible explained to a Chicago Fire Department dispatcher that he was dizzy, his face was numb and that he was at the Thompson Chicago Hotel.

    “They asked me for the hotel address; my symptoms were very difficult to try to engage in that,” Raible recalled.

    The dispatcher suggested Raible look on a business card or a receipt to find the hotel address.

    “What’s the address? I don’t know,” Raible responded. “It’s very hard to talk – I don’t know what’s going on. If I move, I get nauseous.”

    The dispatcher persisted.

    “I understand, sir, but I’m not there. You are,” the dispatcher said. “So I need you to help yourself here, a little bit, and get us an address, so that we can get you an ambulance.”

    Raible told the dispatcher he would call the front desk and he hung up the phone. But in the three minutes since Raible first called 911 for help, he had lost six million brain cells.

    “Every single minute that you have interruption of the blood supply of the brain about two million cells in the brain dies,” said Dr. Ali Alaraj of University of Illinois Hospital & Health Sciences System. “If you act very fast and you treat that patient and restore the blood supply to the brain, you can take someone from being paralyzed to being active, functional and normal.”

    '80% of My Cerebellum Is Gone'

    In fact, Raible had provided 911 dispatchers three major signs of a stroke: he was dizzy, his face was numb and he had trouble speaking.

    Because Raible could not reach the hotel phone due to his stroke symptoms, he used Siri on his smart phone to search for the hotel’s address. He then called 911 a second time and provided another dispatcher the address.

    But the dispatcher did not seem to hear it. Nearly a minute later, a second person on the line relayed the address to the dispatcher.

    According to the dispatch report, it took more than eight minutes from the time Raible first called 911 to the time an ambulance was sent. By then, Raible’s stroke had destroyed more than 16 million of his brain cells.

    Paramedics eventually arrived and took Raible to Northwestern Memorial Hospital, where he was diagnosed with a major stroke in his brain stem.

    “Eighty percent of my cerebellum is gone,” Raible said.

    Raible is currently recovering at home in Pennsylvania and said he hopes to return to work soon. He is giving extra thanks to Siri for providing the address, the person on the 911 call who relayed the address to the dispatcher, the hotel doorman and the hospital staff.

    “There were a number of people that helped – probably saved my life that night,” Raible said.

    Better Location Technology Needed

    Still, he said he hopes Chicago’s 911 system makes changes to better serve callers who are unable to provide an address.

    “I don’t want anyone else to go through the same situation,” Raible said.

    Stratton, the spokeswoman for Chicago’s OEM, said 911 call takers are trained to encourage callers to find some reference of their location, if not known. She said calling from a landline provides an exact location to 911 call takers.

    "The CAD (Computer Aided Dispatch) system used to dispatch calls is a closed system to maintain the security of the platform. As such, researching a location for the caller via the Internet is not an option in the system," Stratton said. "However, every attempt is made to locate the incident/location of the caller in order to provide emergency response as quickly as possible."

    Brian Dale, associate director of medical and quality control at International Academies of Emergency Dispatch, said there are many 911 call centers in the United States that do not give call takers access to the Internet due to privacy reasons. Although, he said some call centers provide limited access to the Internet.

    "Call takers sometimes get frustrated because they want to help. I’m assuming they were following their process," Dale said.  "You try to learn from what happened and try to do better next time. But without the technology, the dispatcher is handcuffed."


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